Paris: The War Against The Jews

* Wearing a kippah could be dangerous here.  ”The Jews are watched every Saturday and are insulted all the way to the synagogue.”
(by Luana De Micco) (ANSAmed)
PARIS, SEPTEMBER 9 – Rue Mathis, Paris. At number 42 a young man of 23 of Algerian origin was found yesterday prostrated on the steps of a fast food restaurant, where he had tried to escape, his body riddled by bullets.
This is the story of the ordinary delinquency in the northeastern part of the capital, the XIX arrondissement, one of the largest and most populated which leads the statistics of violence in Paris: the police counted here more than 18,500 crimes in 2007. More than the nearby XVIII where a little less than 16,000 offences were registered. A trip in the district, a kind of a Parisian ‘Bronx’: big blocks of apartments, grocer’s, bazaars, kebab. Youngsters lean on the walls, at the foot of the barrack-like buildings, listening to rap music on their MP3 players. Here Arabs, black, Jews, white live on the same streets and go to the same bars. It is one of Paris’s most mixed districts, a Babel of colours and languages, but living together is not easy. Assaults, anti-Semitic racism, drug and cell phone trafficking, domestic violence, gang stories, settling the scores between rival gangs are actually on the agenda. Wearing a kippah could be dangerous here. Audrey, 21, said: ”The Jews are watched every Saturday and are insulted all the way to the synagogue.” This is how XIX also is the most anti-Semitic district in Paris with 21 anti-Semitic acts and threats in 2007, according to the Representative Council of Jewish Institutions in France. After three young Jews were beaten three days ago and after Rudy, 23, was left in coma in a public park in June, again because he is Jewish, people in the district are beginning to fear. Yesterday Jewish institutions cried: ”there is a true problem in this arrondissement where daily life is spoiled by insults and incivility,” the president of CRIF, Richard Prasquier, said. The Socialist mayor of the arrondissement, Roger Madec, tried first to play down the facts (”after all, we can all live together”, he said), then he informed that the number of policemen will be increased for the Jewish holidays of October. But if the XIX arrondissement, at the foothill of the park of Villette and the canal of Orcq, has become the ‘black sheep’ of the capital, it is also because it’s at the border with Seine-Saint-Denis, the most dangerous suburb, the department which hosts the most violent cities of France. From the big housing estates of Pantin, Aubervilliers, Saint-Denis, the pushers come to deal drugs between Stanligrad and the nearby districts of Goutte d’Or and Chateau Rouge. A police report, published in June, deemed the XIX arrondissement one of the ‘main supermarkets’ for the drug dealers of the Paris region. Crack, cocaine, marijuana and also ecstasy are sold at 5 euro in the discotheques: one out of six young Parisians said to smoke at least ten joints per month.
International Herald Tribune

New security database angers many in France

Tuesday, September 9, 2008
* Muhammedanism means less freedom for everybody…

PARIS: A new French security database that could track anyone deemed a “possible threat to public order” — even minors as young as 13 — has outraged privacy crusaders and put France’s conservative government on the defensive.

Critics have collected some 130,000 signatures against the database — known by the acronym Edvige — which they contend is better suited for a police state than a modern European democracy.

President Nicolas Sarkozy sought to quell the uproar Tuesday, summoning his prime minister, national police chief and top intelligence officer for a special meeting.

Though Sarkozy stressed the crime-fighting benefits of the database, he ordered the interior minister to open immediate talks about it to ensure that it “protect freedoms,” according to an official in his office. The official was not authorized to be publicly named.

Le Parisien daily’s Tuesday edition quoted lawyer Jean-Marc Fedida as saying Edvige opens up “the possibility of tracking the entire population of France.”

Edvige replaces an obsolete 1991 database that helped France’s police surveillance agency track politicians, labor leaders and other activists — anyone who resorted to violence or supported the use of violence.

But Edvige goes further, gathering personal information on health and sexual orientation, dropping the minimum age for surveillance from 18 to 13 and casting a wider net, allowing security officials to track anyone considered a “possible threat to public order.”

Defenders insist Edvige is a measured response to France’s changing security situation — particularly after a rise in youth violence and nationwide riots that shook poor minority neighborhoods in 2005.

Jean-Pierre Dubois, the president of France’s Human Rights League, called the database “the passage to a real surveillance society.”

Judicial officials complain the new language defining how Edvige can be used is menacingly Orwellian.

“This police logic is that of a society that has come to consider all its youth …. as a threat,” Helene Franco of a magistrates’ union was quoted as saying in the Le Monde newspaper.

* Won’t be long before there is no more policing and the state abdicates its responsibility…

The clash over Edvige has spilled over into the government, with some ministers sounding alarm bells about possible civil liberties infringements.

Interior Minister Michele Alliot-Marie reached out to critics who say that tracking minors could have negative repercussions, saying Tuesday that minors’ records could possibly be removed from the database after a time.

Human Rights Minister Rama Yade urged clarifications Tuesday, particularly about the inclusion of sexual orientation.

* Guess where she comes from with a name like that…

The Conseil d’Etat, France’s highest court for questions involving the public administration, is examining more than a dozen complaints about Edvige. It is expected to rule on the database by the end of the year.

Many European governments began tracking activists Islamic terrorists after a wave of radical violence in the 1970s and 1980s.

Britain’s DNA database is the largest in any country, with 5 percent of the population tracked. The database contains DNA information collected from crime scenes and taken from individuals in police custody. It is not limited to DNA samples from those convicted of a crime.

Switzerland now only keeps files on violent extremists. The country pared down its databases following an investigation in the late 1980s which revealed that security agencies had collected thousands of files on Swiss citizens, mainly left-wing activists motherfuckers.. Some 10 percent of the Swiss are believed to have been tracked.

French Republican Value: Disarm Yourself for Self Defense

A quote from French Conservative presidential frontrunner Nicolas Sarkozy on RTL radio, 22 September 2006

I would like to say one thing, in what is my conception of the Republic, security is the responsibility of the State, I am against militias, I am against the private ownership of firearms, and I’m trying to make you think about that. If you are assaulted by an armed burglar, he’ll use his weapon more effectively than you anyway so you’re risking your life. If the criminal is not armed and you are and you shoot, your life will be ruined, because killing someone over a theft is not in line with the republican values that are mine. The private ownership of firearms is dangerous. I understand your exasperation for having been burglarized two times, I understand the fear that your wife and daughter may have but the answer is in the efficiency of the police and the efficiency of the judiciary process, the answer is not in having guns at home.


Associated Press writers Emmanuel Georges-Picot in Paris and Frank Jordans in Geneva contributed to this report.

One thought on “Paris: The War Against The Jews”

Comments are closed.