Mohammad Qatanani Update: "Imam's victory on deportation from U.S. short-lived"

By Elizabeth Llorente for The Record via JW

*   ”ICE believes that the immigration judge made mistakes of law, judgment and discretion,” said U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.” She sure did.

                           Supporters of Imam Mohammad Qatanani, not shown, cheer as he waves to them from the steps of a federal building in Newark, N.J., Monday, June 2, 2008, during a lunch break in his deportation trial. The United States government has rejected his bid for permanent U.S. residency, saying Qatanani failed to disclose a 1993 arrest and conviction in Israel for being a member of Hamas on his green card application. Qatanani denies the charges. From AP Photo by Mike Derer.

4 months ago: Supporters of Imam Mohammad Qatanani, not shown, cheer as he waves to them from the steps of a federal building in Newark, N.J., Monday, June 2, 2008, during a lunch break in his deportation trial. The United States government has rejected his bid for permanent U.S. residency, saying Qatanani failed to disclose a 1993 arrest and conviction in Israel for being a member of Hamas on his green card application. Qatanani denies the charges.

* For months, noisy mobs of Muhammedans tried to intimidate and blackmail judge and jurors into letting this convicted Hamas terrorist and his clan to stay in the US. A moonbat judge gave in, but as they say: its not over till the fat lady sings. There is still hope that this jihadist will be evicted in the next round.

* Bleeding hearts from Jewish News: 

“Muslim cleric denies direct involvement in Hamas activities” of course he does!

* Massachusetts imam, brother of Pakistani jihadist, admits immigration fraud, will leave U.S.

 

 

                                Qatanani supporters shout support for the imam outside the courthouse.

Qatanani supporters shout support for the imam outside the courthouse.

HACKENSACK, N.J. – What was expected to be a day of jubilation at the Islamic Center of Passaic County in Paterson Friday turned into one of bitterness as news spread that the mosque’s spiritual leader must renew his fight against deportation.”We thought it was over,” said Awatif Abadrabbo, referring to the announcement by Homeland Security officials that were appealing an immigration judge’s ruling last month granting Imam Mohammad Qatanani permanent U.S. residency.

”We want him to stay,” she said. ”He has been good for us, for our children.”

Other congregants said the appeal would taint a relationship between the mosque and federal officials developed since Sept. 11, 2001, when Qatanani was one of the first imams nationwide to condemn the attacks and invited the FBI to the mosque to address the congregation.

 

If he is really connected with Hamas, that relationship is simply evidence of the naivete and ignorance of the FBI officials in question, and is already tainted.

”This is vindictive,” said Aref Assaf, spokesman for the imam. ”The implications for relations between our community and the federal government are damaging and far-reaching.”

I wonder if Assaf has ever considered what are or should be the implications for relations between his community and the federal government of their having an imam linked to a jihad terrorist group.

DHS filed a notice Thursday that they will appeal Immigration Court Judge Alberto Riefkohl’s ruling. DHS, which includes immigration agencies, contends in its appeal notice that Qatanani ”engaged in terrorist activity” in the early 1990s with Hamas, a group in the Middle East that the United States classifies as terrorist.Riefkohl rejected the DHS claims, which relied heavily on Israeli documents that the judge found questionable.

”ICE believes that the immigration judge made mistakes of law, judgment and discretion,” said U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Many Muslims view the government’s new effort to deport the imam, hailed across New Jersey as a voice of moderation and a bridge-builder between Muslims and non-Muslims, as an attack on their religion and their culture….

During his time as imam, Qatanani, a soft-spoken, diminutive man, has won the respect of people from different religions and ethnic communities. In addition, the state’s most powerful political and law enforcement officials often make a point of attending major events at his mosque. On Wednesday, at a 7 a.m. event which marked the end of the holy month of Ramadan, New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine was the main speaker at the mosque.

 

That doesn’t mean anything except that Corzine and the others are as clueless as are most other public officials.

Homeland Security had argued during the four days of the trial earlier this year that Qatanani, 44, lied on his 1999 application for residency because he failed to disclose a conviction in Israel in 1993 based on purported links to Hamas. They tried to forge a link between Qatanani and the mosque’s former imam, Mohamed El-Mezain, who is facing conspiracy charges by the federal government in Dallas. The government is seeking a conviction against El-Mezaain and other past officers of the Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development, a Muslim charity shut down in 2001 that U.S. officials accuse of funneling more than $12 million to Hamas….


Fitzgerald: Visiting a mosque with Jon Corzine

”We thought it was over,” said Awatif Abadrabbo, referring to the announcement by Homeland Security officials that were appealing an immigration judge’s ruling last month granting Imam Mohammad Qatanani permanent U.S. residency….During his time as imam, Qatanani, a soft-spoken, diminutive man, has won the respect of people from different religions and ethnic communities. In addition, the state’s most powerful political and law enforcement officials often make a point of attending major events at his mosque. On Wednesday, at a 7 a.m. event which marked the end of the holy month of Ramadan, New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine was the main speaker at the mosque. – from this article

 

Jon Corzine may have presented himself, a little too easily, I’m afraid, as a “barefoot boy from Wall Street,” as Wendell Willkie was said to have done in a campaign long past. But if Corzine thinks that at this point he can show up for some Ramadan-breaking event with people and mosques with very doubtful associations (isn’t the imam you keep, if that imam has supported Hamas, just about as doubtful an association as is needed?), and that no one will mind or remember when election time comes round at last, he’s got another Wall-Street think coming.

I hope he, and every other political figure who is tempted to show up at these mosques, realizes that their behavior helps, inadvertently, to legitimize the activities of those who participate in, directly or indirectly, the Jihad to remove all obstacles to the spread, and then the dominance, of Islam.

Corzine and others like him should be put on the defensive. They should be made to think twice, and to start learning about Islam before blandly or blindly engaging in behavior whose consequences they clearly do not know, or do not care to think about too deeply. Such people have to be punished, and the only way to punish them is to vote them out, or to make their re-election far more difficult and painful than it otherwise would have been.

They have to learn — that they have to learn. It is not asking too much, more than seven years after the attacks of 9/11/2001, to ask these people to begin to inquire into the texts, the tenets, the attitudes, the atmospherics of Islam. There are books, books on Muslim doctrine, books on the history of Muslim behavior — that is, the 1350-year history of Muslim conquest of non-Muslim lands, and the subsequent subjugation of many different kinds of non-Muslims, from Spain to East Asia. Corzine has the time, and he has the responsibility to find out about this. All the ribbon-cutting and check-handing-over ceremonies, with the babbitt-like pictures of the assorted smilers, mean nothing compared to his duty to find out, and then to help instruct, and protect. He made a bloody killing on Wall Street, and then he wanted power, he wanted glory. Well, he got the power, and the glory, as that appetizing thing, a U.S. Senator.

Now he has a responsibility. Now he has to do some work, to engage in study. It may be painful. He may have fallen out of the habit, or perhaps never, save in the banal and not-terribly-impressive enterprise of making a lot of money, learned how to do it. But do it he must. The people he claims to represent deserve it.

Before visiting a mosque, he and others like him should become aware of the meaning of the phrase “taqiyya and tu-quoque.” Visitors to mosques should be prepared to ask — sweetly, in an Infidel-Wants-to-Know Mode — about Muhammad’s marriage to Aisha when she was nine, about the assassinations of Asma bint Marwan and others, about the massacre of the inoffensive Jewish farmers of the Khaybar oasis, about the decapitation of 600-900 helpless prisoners of the Banu Qurayza, and about so much more. Be sure to mention the Hadith.

Informed Infidels should go also. Do not let the presentation to those Infidels (hmmm, doesn’t that spicy chicken and that pita, and then the honeyed dessert, all waiting for us afterwards, smell good, I can’t keep my mind off it, how nice these people are, what good hearts they have to invite us in to share their food and their faith) be allowed to finish without making the most that you possibly can out of that “question time.” And bear in mind that you will only be called on once, so you had better have your questions ready — not really to be answered, but so that they can provoke thought and unease in your fellow Infidels like Corzine, who have come, unlike you, without any mental weapons whatsoever.

One thought on “Mohammad Qatanani Update: "Imam's victory on deportation from U.S. short-lived"”

  1. I think the old USSR had the right idea-create places of internal exile for troublemakers. If we can’t exile them to a desert island then let there be places of exile in every infidel nation. For the US, I nominate Death Valley. Koranists will love it there-so much like the hallowed deserts that Mo passed through so long ago.

Comments are closed.