Norway: Prayers, Prostitution & a 'Difficult Attitude to Women'

OSLO/TRONDHEIM (VG) At work the police interpreter demanded time to pray and his own prayer room.

Thanks to Cecilie with have a translation

In his spare time he paid for sex.

No, you will not find words like Muslims or Islam in this article:

He demanded, and was given both time and his own room to pray. He was seen as having an attitude to women which was difficult to combine with having female colleagues. Some people found it difficult to cooperate with him….

The interpreter was caught red-handed after buying sexual services from a Russian prostitute and was fined NK 15,000 – which he accepted.


It was at the end of October last year two detectives from the Trondheim police went to check out an address where a Russian woman was working as a prostitute. The flat where the prostitute received her customers was in the so-called Brun’s Botel (‘Live-tel’) in the centre of Trondheim.

When the officers arrived at the flat, the police interpreter came out of the room. When confronted, he admitted that he had bought sexual services.

VG has been in contact with the woman from whom the police interpreter paid for sex. She claims not to remember the man in question and that she doesn’t wish to comment on the case.


Was disputed

Police super intendent Egil Gabrielsen of South-Trøndelag police district doesn’t wish to comment on the case, and neither does the police interpreter.

Lawyer Bjørn Skuggevik has represented a female police officer who chose to resign from the Police Aliens Unit (PAU) after run-ins with the man.

According to the lawyer, the interpreter has been a topic of dispute in PAU.

– He demanded, and was given both time and his own room to pray. He was seen as having an attitude to women which was difficult to combine with having female colleagues. Some people found it difficult to cooperate with him, lawyer Bjørn Skuggevik says.

Demands

– The behaviour of the interpreter was brought up in meetings many times, but the administration didn’t want to exclude him, says Skuggevik.

The chief of PAU, police chief Ingrid Wirum, says people used as interpreters have to fulfill many criteria, such as no former convictions.

– Besides, the interpreter the lawyer is talking about, has for various reasons not been hired by PAU for a very long time, says Wirum.