UN in plot to destroy our culture & civilization by forcing us to tolerate Islamic intolerance….

“A government is the most dangerous threat to man’s rights: it holds a legal monopoly on the use of physical force against legally disarmed victims.

There are two sides to every issue: one side is right and the other is wrong, but the middle is always evil.”

(Ayn Rand)

You shall be muzzled:

Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu underlined importance of freedom of expression, mutual understanding, tolerance, respect and empathy.

The head of the Organization of the Islamic Cooperation (OIC) said on Friday that what was important was the implementation of a United Nations (UN) Human Right Council resolution on combatting intolerance.

‘Yuman Rites’ thanks to Mullah

Practical measures to promote a culture of tolerance

‘‘Intolerance, including anti-semitism, islamophobia and christianophobia, is on the increase’’ said UN Human Rights chief Navi Pillay at a panel discussion on the promotion of a culture of tolerance held last June in Geneva.

Pillay opened the expert panel stating that  “through dialogue and collaboration “ States could step up to their obligations and take practical decisive actions and measures to address and eliminate incidents of intolerance. ’’

(“Dialogue and collaboration” translated: the Islamic beggar nations demand and we pay….)

Experts at the panel discussion identified intercultural dialogue, awareness-raising, education and criminalization of incitement to hatred and intolerance, as practical measures that could possibly combat religious intolerance and promote a culture of tolerance.

(No call on Islamic hell-holes to stop persecution of minorities)

Pillay said that States should act as catalyst for intercultural dialogue. She identified education as crucial in ‘‘fostering respect for all human rights and religious diversity,’’  and said that by committing in practice -  through laws, measures, words and deed – to all human rights,  “States can promote religious harmony and facilitate the intercultural dialogue which helps create peaceful and stable societies.”

We had peaceful and stable societies before the Mohammedan hordes moved in…..

Related:

The promotion of reciprocal understanding between cultures was also suggested as a measure to combat the persistent ‘‘dark, obscuring, cultural glasses’’ that religious intolerance creates, said Doudou Diène, Vice-Chair of the International Institute of Politics and Civilization Research.

(Doudou =  parasite in chief)

Simona Santoro, who works for the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), said that OSCE used educational tools to teach students and civil society, and to train teachers about other cultures. ”Supporting civil society to come together and learn from each other’s experience, can be very beneficial,’’ Santoro said.

We can learn nothing from Mohammedanism, only destruction.

She also spoke about various legislative and administrative measures OSCE takes to combat religious intolerance. For instance, OSCE offers to review governments’ legislations on freedom of religion and belief and also developed guidelines and key policy issues for combating hate crime.

“Any resistance to the hate-cult of Islam will be relentlessly prosecuted”

To foster a culture of tolerance, Amir Bilal Soofi,  (corrupt pond scum) President of the Pakistani think-tank Research Society on International Law, suggested a legislation ‘‘criminalizing incitement to imminent violence’’ and that religious sites be legally declared as ‘‘special places’’. He also proposed a regular ‘‘institutionalized inter-faith debate amongst the genuine religious scholars, jurists and experts.’

(Da’awa. Spreading Islam. Nothing but.)

The US Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom Suzan Johnson Cook highlighted the duty that political leaders had to inform civil society about religious tolerance and to act on legislation. She believed that states had ‘‘tools at their disposal to combat religious intolerance’’ and solely needed the political will to use them. In her opinion, it was the responsibility of leaders to criticize hateful ideology. She also deemed preventative measures key to combating religious intolerance because ‘‘it is better to create a climate that seeks to prevent discrimination and violence before it happens.”

Please note that this babble about ‘hateful ideology’ only concerns European nations who are to be Islamized, not African beggar nations to tolerate us.

Pillay expressed the hope that the panel discussion would help promote “a culture of mutual respect for diversity and a better appreciation of its enriching quality.”

“Mutual” means let Islam lord over us.

Practical measures to promote tolerance will also likely be discussed in a series of regional workshops on the prohibition of incitement to national, racial or religious hatred, as reflected in international human rights law, being organized by the UN Human Rights office throughout 2011.

————————–

Pamela Geller adds this: State Department reaches Blasphemy agreement with OIC in Turkey

The Human Rights Council has given us a comprehensive framework for addressing this issue on the international level. But at the same time, we each have to work to do more to promote respect for religious differences in our own countries. In the United States, I will admit, there are people who still feel vulnerable or marginalized as a result of their religious beliefs. And we have seen how the incendiary actions of just a very few people, a handful in a country of nearly 300 million, can create wide ripples of intolerance.

Who is this cow talking about? Me? Spencer? Etc.? 

We also understand that, for 235 years, freedom of expression has been a universal right at the core of our democracy. So we are focused on promoting interfaith education and collaboration, enforcing antidiscrimination laws, protecting the rights of all people to worship as they choose, and to use some old-fashioned techniques of peer pressure and shaming, so that people don’t feel that they have the support to do what we abhor.

In Europe, we are seeing communities coming together to address both the old scourge of anti-Semitism and the new strains of anti-Muslim bias that continue to undermine the continent’s democratic ideals. Across the Middle East and Asia, we look to both people and leaders to resist the incitement of extremists who seek to inflame sectarian tensions, and reject the persecution of religious minorities such as the Copts or Ahmadis or Baha’is.

This is so twisted that your head spins. The “old scourge of anti-semitism” is largely driven by Muslims, in line with Islamic teachings; the “new strains of anti-Muslim bias” consist of merely pointing this out.

In Egypt and Tunisia, we hope to see minorities brought into the process of drafting a new constitution and given a seat at the table as new democracies take shape

Yeah right. Slow down on those mushrooms, sHrillary.

And I know that, here in Turkey, there is a potential upcoming constitutional reform process, and we look forward to new protections for religious freedom as well. Tomorrow, I will meet with his all holiness, the ecumenical patriarch. And as I do on every trip, and as my friend Ahmet knows, we will continue to urge the Turkish Government to reopen the Halki Seminary as a symbol of Turkey’s commitment to religious freedom.

No country, including my own, has a monopoly on truth or a secret formula for ethnic and religious harmony. This takes hard work and persistence and patience. But wherever we come from and however we worship, all of us can do more in our own lives, in our positions of leadership, and in our communities, to bridge the divides that separate us. Here in Istanbul, which for so long has symbolized a bridge between cultures and continents, we have the opportunity to recommit ourselves to this goal.

Fifteen years ago in this room, the secretary general said about Istanbul, “This is a city which for over five centuries has been one of those rare lands of peace, where people of different religions live together in an environment of perfect harmony.” So if you will permit us, Secretary General and Foreign Minister, we want to take some of that spirit home from wherever we came – (laughter) – and we want to do so by transporting it in our hearts so that it is imprinted there and continues to remind us of the work ahead.

What planet is this witch on?

9 thoughts on “UN in plot to destroy our culture & civilization by forcing us to tolerate Islamic intolerance….”

  1. Yep, all there in the headline. That Clinton woman seems ok with it too. Isn’t she an American? Or did I get that wrong …. Kenyan maybe? Indonesian? Hard to know what’s going on these days. We all just going to be forced to ACCEPT this stuff?

  2. The Klintoons have done enormous damage to America and the world. They will continue to do so until they are stopped dead in their tracks.

    The establishment of 3 jihad-narco fiefdoms right smack in the middle of Europe, (Bosnia Herzegovina & Kosovo) slick Willies abject pandering to the Arabs and his shameless whoring for petro-dollar$ make the Klintoon years one of the worst periods in American history.

    And now the lesbian loon, accompanied for years by a Saudi mole (Huma Abedin) wants to take away our G-d given right to free speech.

    Spit!

    These people must be stopped. This is the loons running the asylum!

  3. African bananas on Norwegian train
    “I hate white people! You hate black people!”

    “A 39 years old” – African – refused to pay on the train. Attacked train ticket controller, screaming and kicking, when the ticket controller asked him to pay. He still intended to stay on the train bound for Oslo without paying, and claimed racism when he was asked to step off the train. Police finally took care of him.
    http://politisktinkorrekt.info/2011/07/16/afrikan-gick-amok-pa-norskt-tag/

    Oslo Airport “Chapel” – for muslims?

    http://politisktinkorrekt.info/2011/07/16/islamisering-av-gardemoens-flygplats-i-oslo/

  4. Hilary is a gutless whimp – she is marching to the tune set by Obama and she has neither the intellect nor the personal courage to stand up for American principles.

  5. Hilary Clinton’s remarks:

    Remarks at the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) High-Level Meeting on Combating Religious Intolerance

    * Three great monotheistic [Abrahamic] faiths canard flies again, implying worship of the same god, despite the clear attributes of allah and God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

    In our conversation 15 years ago, I remember the secretary general talking about the imperative for us to move beyond these differences and how much the three great monotheistic religions have in common, especially our respective commandments to love our neighbors and to seek peace and understanding. Well, today, this wisdom that is ageless is as important as ever. We have seen violent attacks across our world, where those who are members of minority communities – either religious or ethnic – have been killed by their neighbors. We have seen the transitions to democracy that are so inspiring in the Middle East and North Africa, but have also exposed ethnic and religious minorities to new dangers.

    * Discrimination, profiling & hate crimes prohibited – free speech permitted (for now), but it would be very easy to say or write something prohibited (contray, negative, unharmonious etc).

    [These are fundamental freedoms that belong to all people in all places, and they are certainly essential to democracy. But as the secretary general just outlined, we now need to move to implementation. The resolution calls upon states to protect freedom of religion, to counter offensive expression through education, interfaith dialogue, and public debate, and to prohibit discrimination, profiling, and hate crimes, but not to criminalize speech unless there is an incitement to imminent violence. We will be looking to all countries to hold themselves accountable and to join us in reporting to the UN’s Office of the High Commissioner of Human Rights on their progress in taking these steps.]

    * Conformity through peer pressure & shaming…

    [The Human Rights Council has given us a comprehensive framework for addressing this issue on the international level. But at the same time, we each have to work to do more to promote respect for religious differences in our own countries. In the United States, I will admit, there are people who still feel vulnerable or marginalized as a result of their religious beliefs. And we have seen how the incendiary actions of just a very few people, a handful in a country of nearly 300 million, can create wide ripples of intolerance. We also understand that, for 235 years, freedom of expression has been a universal right at the core of our democracy. So we are focused on promoting interfaith education and collaboration, enforcing antidiscrimination laws, protecting the rights of all people to worship as they choose, and to use some old-fashioned techniques of peer pressure and shaming, so that people don’t feel that they have the support to do what we abhor.]

    * And so on

  6. Hilary Clinton’s remarks:

    http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2011/07/168636.htm

    Remarks at the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) High-Level Meeting on Combating Religious Intolerance

    * Three great monotheistic [Abrahamic] faiths canard flies again, implying worship of the same god, despite the clear attributes of allah and God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

    In our conversation 15 years ago, I remember the secretary general talking about the imperative for us to move beyond these differences and how much the three great monotheistic religions have in common, especially our respective commandments to love our neighbors and to seek peace and understanding. Well, today, this wisdom that is ageless is as important as ever. We have seen violent attacks across our world, where those who are members of minority communities – either religious or ethnic – have been killed by their neighbors. We have seen the transitions to democracy that are so inspiring in the Middle East and North Africa, but have also exposed ethnic and religious minorities to new dangers.

    * Discrimination, profiling & hate crimes prohibited – free speech permitted (for now), but it would be very easy to say or write something prohibited (contray, negative, unharmonious etc).

    [These are fundamental freedoms that belong to all people in all places, and they are certainly essential to democracy. But as the secretary general just outlined, we now need to move to implementation. The resolution calls upon states to protect freedom of religion, to counter offensive expression through education, interfaith dialogue, and public debate, and to prohibit discrimination, profiling, and hate crimes, but not to criminalize speech unless there is an incitement to imminent violence. We will be looking to all countries to hold themselves accountable and to join us in reporting to the UN’s Office of the High Commissioner of Human Rights on their progress in taking these steps.]

    * Conformity through peer pressure & shaming…

    [The Human Rights Council has given us a comprehensive framework for addressing this issue on the international level. But at the same time, we each have to work to do more to promote respect for religious differences in our own countries. In the United States, I will admit, there are people who still feel vulnerable or marginalized as a result of their religious beliefs. And we have seen how the incendiary actions of just a very few people, a handful in a country of nearly 300 million, can create wide ripples of intolerance. We also understand that, for 235 years, freedom of expression has been a universal right at the core of our democracy. So we are focused on promoting interfaith education and collaboration, enforcing antidiscrimination laws, protecting the rights of all people to worship as they choose, and to use some old-fashioned techniques of peer pressure and shaming, so that people don’t feel that they have the support to do what we abhor.]

    * And so on

  7. All of us who know what is happening have a duty to speak out and expose the truth. Somehow across the western world we must organise ourselves. ‘Even if you are a minority of one, the truth is still the truth.’ Ghandi.

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