A Slut Named Putz

Mein Leben als Ausländer  (My Life as a Foreigner)

Die verlorene Ehre der Ulrike P.  from PI (the lost honor of U. Putz)

German SPIEGEL Moonbat Ulike Putz, a typically progressive “Israel-critical” reporterette,  decided to have her out-of wedlock baby in a Lebanese hospital.  Everything went well, her parents came for a visit, she got a passport for the child from the pesky German embassy officials, and then….  came the day she wanted to leave Lebanon.

For that she needed a birth certificate.

Not an easy task:   the mustachioed  Leb/Hezbollah officials were not amused. They  made it clear  that she had given birth to a bastard.  And who’s ever heard of an unmarried female giving birth without a father?

Putz  finally did get her birth certificate, after a fair bit of running around (producing four witnesses, I wonder how she found them)  and paying bribes to a number of  greasy Hezbollah thugs, who certified  the birth of her daughter by writing ‘bastard’ on the document.

All things considered, miss Putz is lucky that she wasn’t stoned to death. Did she learn a lesson from running the gauntlet as an infidel whore  in Lebanon? I doubt it.

The Putz type is learning resistant. Typical attention seeker she is, she even had the hide to write about her misguided adventures  in the SPIGEL, making sure the whole world knows.

The full article is in German, sorry I haven’t got time to translate it. If you know somebody who can, please send it in.

Just to get an idea of what kind of people the Putz’s are, here’s a pic and an article about the father,  US moonbat  Jason Koutsoukis

The two found each other, must be a perfect match.

4 thoughts on “A Slut Named Putz”

  1. Putz, what a perfect last name for a libtard. It’s too bad they didn’t arrest the libtard for adultery, it would’ve been an enlightening experience for the idiot.

  2. It looks like a bureaucratic vicious circle: If you as a foreigner in Lebanon gives birth to a child can not leave with the baby easily. Because only allowed out who has an entry stamp. Difficult for newborns, right? That was the beginning of SPIEGEL ONLINE correspondent Ulrike Putz of trouble getting started.

    Everything had worked like a charm: the birth of our daughter in a private hospital in Beirut had gone well, the baby slept a lot and cried a little, the newly minted grandparents had arrived, appeared delighted, and flew back to Germany.

    DISPLAY

    Then we can start again yes, we thought: In the last weeks of pregnancy we had – Arab spring or not – in Beirut were stuck. And although I was thankful not to have to push my baby belly through the revolutionary Libya, I had the vagabond life of the Middle East correspondent missing. Four weeks after the birth I wanted to finally go: with my daughter and her father, from Beirut to Amman, Jordan.
    The German embassy within days of the children exhibited a flattering fit decorated baby photo and a registration “of birth: Beirut, Lebanon . ” Our trip was nothing in the way – except for the registration of children in the Beirut civil register. Which was necessary because the little girl so no entry stamp in your passport in Lebanon had, it said. No entry, no exit stamp. Only the entry in the register of births and then to be obtained special permission from the General Security in Lebanon allows foreign parents of children born to leave this country.

    Cumbersome, but doable, we thought, we’ll do a quick step in Mukhtar, a kind of neighborhood mayors. Everything was fine until the magistrate asked for our marriage certificate. “We are not married,” replied my friend. Silence. ; Stunned. Finally, stammered: “It does not exist.”

    Lebanon is a decent country

    After discussion in rudimentary English elongated crystallized out the following: In his long career as a civil servant, Mr. Itani never dealing with unmarried parents. Something like that in Lebanon there is simply no, he kept repeating. Lebanon is a decent country.

    If we wanted to register our child would be a notation “bastard” must be entered on her birth certificate says Mr. Itani. Bastard? Yes, a fatherless child. Before this could happen, but would need four witnesses to attest that we are the parents of Polly. Why is the father of his paternity leave testify in order to register it then as a fatherless, was not out. Nor, who to cite as witnesses to prove that he is the producer of the girl. When the mother at birth, so enough nurses and doctors were on hand to vouch for them. But in the case of the father?

    “Forget it, we go to the neighbor-Mukhtar Kiez”, we granted Mr. Itani.

    Mukhtar number two, then said flatly no, he would never sully his hands thus, an unmarried mother and her brat issue papers, the rough translation of an Arabic tirade. That the carrier mustache to emphasize his disgust was not spitting out, probably because he loves his Persian rug.

    About Us main office decorations should have warned the Mayor’s office: As with the teenagers were hanging posters of pop stars in this Mukhtar Politikerproträts on the wall. Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah, Iran’s Ayatollah Khomeini, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. The chief citizen was politically closer to the hard-liners at home.

    Tears in the mother and child – but no exit

    We decided to take a chance, when we first with baby and suitcases at the airport stood, the guards would let us through already. No way: Our protestations were, we tried to make an exit permit, they could not get it, because none of us logs on the child, because we were not married, fell on deaf ears. Despite tears in mother and child and the intervention of the German Embassy in the child’s father had to fly that night alone.

    The next day I spent at various offices, bills changed over and under the table, the hands, punches were swung, if signatures: the message had found a way how we could save our child’s entry in the register of births under the heading “bastard”. The contrast of the helpful, inventive German consular official at the Lebanese stubborn bureaucrats could have been imposed throughout the Odyssey can hardly be greater.

    DISPLAY

    The last scene of the drama with a happy ending took place at the headquarters of General Security starting in Beirut: a building that could serve any time for the film version of Kafka’s bureaucratic nightmare “The Castle” as a backdrop. As a Lebanese official of the little ones there finally an exit permit stamped in the passport, the child smiled.
    Mum screamed again, this time from sheer relief.

    Before he came out again the kids passport, the officials wanted to but still get rid of something. “You should get married at last,” he advised, and was still a sweet award from his personal experience. “I promise you, is not so bad marriage

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