Englands Elite Takes Another Dive Into the Totalitarian Sewer, Arrests Tommy Robinson

This will not stand. This outrageous, heavy-handed transgression will come to bite the elitist coward David Cameron and his cronies so bad in their sorry asses  they won’t know what hit ’em.

Here’s a first reaction From The English Defense League

 Hunger Strike

THE leader of the English Defence League, Stephen Lennon, (Tommy Robinson’s real name)  is on hunger strike and is claiming to be a “political prisoner of the state”, following his arrest after a protest in London on Saturday. (More)

Thanks to Vlad Tepes for the pic’s and comments

BREAKING NEWS: EDL’S TOMMY ROBINSON ENROUTE TO BEDFORD PRISON

Outrage is too mild a word:

UK Muslim Youth Stone EDL Bus – Cops Arrest Passengers…

From the Beep via the Religion of Peace:

A coach full of English Defence League supporters was pelted with missiles after it broke down in east London. The coach was carrying 44 EDL members when it stopped in Mile End Road, Tower Hamlets.

About 100 Asian (PC euphemism for Mohammedan creeps) teenagers then pelted it with bricks and stones, according to a BBC reporter at the scene.  Police arrested all 44 EDL supporters, who were travelling from a protest in Aldgate earlier on Saturday. A double decker bus was used to evacuate them.

Police said there had already been one altercation with local youths after the vehicle stopped in Whitechapel Road and some passengers got off the coach.

They got back on board and the coach pulled away – but it later suffered a failure and ground to a halt.

BBC reporter Paraic O’ Brien, who was on the scene, said nearly 100 local teenagers then attacked it with missiles.

He said the police were on the scene extremely quickly.

‘Extremely tense’The reporter said within a short space of time there were a number of riot vans and 200 police officers in the vicinity.

O’Brien said: “It was extremely tense and if that number of officers had not arrived it could have gone the other way and become a major incident.”

The police commandeered a London bus and moved the EDL supporters onto it before escorting the bus east.

Protesters and police
The earlier demonstration was rowdy but major disorder was avoided

But a group of youths subsequently sat down in the middle of Mile End Road, blocking the bus and forcing it to stop.

At this point a large number of Asian men began arriving from a nearby estate.

The reporter said by then the situation had become very scary.

The police charged the youths and scuffles broke out.

Another group standing on a footbridge over the road threw bricks at the bus.

Police managed to clear the road and the bus left the area.

The EDL, which says it is protesting against Islamic extremism in the UK, had earlier held a protest in Aldgate after a planned march through east London was banned by the government.

Shafiur Rahman had organised stewards for a rival demonstration earlier in the day.

He said that allowing the bus through Tower Hamlets was a major security error that could have ended in disaster.

Investigation ongoingMr Rahman is a member of the Islamic Forum of Europe.

A Met spokeswoman said: “A coach containing individuals believed to have participated in the EDL demonstration stopped in Whitechapel Road – some passengers got off and an altercation took place with some local youths who had gathered.

“Shortly after, the coach broke down outside Stepney Green Underground Station, and a further disturbance took place.

“Officers commandeered a double decker bus before transferring the passengers and escorting them off the borough.”

EDL supporter
There was flag-waving and chanting at the EDL protest

She added: “All those on the coach were arrested for public order offences and an investigation is ongoing to identify others outside the bus who participated in the disorder.”

Meanwhile the EDL’s second in command, Kevin Carroll, has told the BBC its founder Stephen Lennon will hand himself in to police.

Lennon, who was convicted in July of leading a street brawl with 100 football fans, breached bail conditions by taking part in the demonstration.

On Saturday an EDL regional organiser had claimed Lennon had already been arrested – but this proved to be untrue.

A total of 60 people – including the 44 involved in the bus incident – were arrested in connection with the EDL protest.

Offences included assault on a police officer, common assault, drunk and disorderly behaviour and affray.

Police estimated 1,000 EDL supporters and 1,500 counter-protesters had gathered.

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Below, a very interesting comment from this site:

anonplopop

Monday, September 5, 2011 at 08:00 PM

I live on Mile End Road, the bus carrying the EDL supporters was attacked literally right outside my window. I had to watch in fear and horror as hundreds (there were far more than 100) local Asian children threw missiles, heard foul abuse and attempted to attack the coach. At no point did I see or hear anything provocative from the EDL members on the bus. They were obviously arrested for their own safety and to quell the bloodlust of this rabid mob. There were at least 200 police in riot gear, my road was cordoned off, and it was an extremely intimidating atmosphere… not just for the public but also for the police. I witnessed with my own eyes a gang of weedy Muslim children who couldn’t punch there way out of a wet paper bag individually, verbally abusing and threatening the police.. in fact picking out a female officer for special treatment. I was very anti-EDL and BNP not so long ago. But when it is on your door step, in your face, it is a different story. Some EDL members will inevitably be racist morons. More still will be unable to articulate themselves clearly… after all they are uneducated and working class. But Tommy Robinson is absolutely correct, he is a political prisoner of the state, and everybody who cherishes this country and OUR traditions should support him. The fact that no Muslims were arrested on Mile End Road says two things first of all the political pressure on the police to treat the EDL as criminals and secondly the great difficulties of making any arrests… These animals run in packs and make it very dangerous for an officer to apprehend one except in large numbers. I even watched one group with my own eyes approach an officer on his own to tell him they were going to get ‘tooled up’.

*********************************

From The English Defense League:

A martyr is someone who suffers for a cause. And Tommy is most definitely someone who has suffered for his.

He is currently in a cell in Bedford Prison, having broken his bail conditions in order to attend the EDL demonstration in Tower Hamlets. There were many good reasons why we chose to demonstrate in Tower Hamlets, and Tommy simply felt that he could not sit idly by whilst the movement he founded took to the streets to protest against the formation of Britain’s ‘Islamic Republic’ (not our words, but those of a “very senior figure in the Tower Hamlets Labour Party”).

Ever since the EDL was founded we have found ourselves battling against politicians, but we have also sought to maintain a commitment to peaceful protest, respect the role played by the police, and never seek to undermine the law of the land. Tommy’s decision to break his bail conditions was therefore far from an easy one. It was not a reckless decision, but one made with a full appreciation of the likely consequences.

Tommy judged that the right to free speech, the right to peaceful protest, and his duty to speak out against the tyrannical influence of radical Islam, outweighed the court’s decision to place such strict limitations on his freedoms; a decision lent weight by the European Court of Human Rights’ rulings on the right to freedom of assembly. Continue reading →

3 thoughts on “Englands Elite Takes Another Dive Into the Totalitarian Sewer, Arrests Tommy Robinson”

  1. I hope that Mr. Robinson continues with his tactic of claiming political prisoner status. This is a wonderful opportunity and if he remains steadfast, this could truly be the beginning of something really significant.

  2. The English Defence League has just issued the following statement about the imprisonment of their leader, Tommy Robinson:

    http://gatesofvienna.blogspot.com/2011/09/tommy-robinson-patriot-and-martyr.html

    Tommy Robinson: A Patriot and a Martyr

    A martyr is someone who suffers for a cause. And Tommy is most definitely someone who has suffered for his.

    He is currently in a cell in Bedford Prison, having broken his bail conditions in order to attend the EDL demonstration in Tower Hamlets. There were many good reasons why we chose to demonstrate in Tower Hamlets, and Tommy simply felt that he could not sit idly by whilst the movement he founded took to the streets to protest against the formation of Britain’s ‘Islamic Republic’ (not our words, but those of a “very senior figure in the Tower Hamlets Labour Party”).

    Ever since the EDL was founded we have found ourselves battling against politicians, but we have also sought to maintain a commitment to peaceful protest, respect the role played by the police, and never seek to undermine the law of the land. Tommy’s decision to break his bail conditions was therefore far from an easy one. It was not a reckless decision, but one made with a full appreciation of the likely consequences.

    Tommy judged that the right to free speech, the right to peaceful protest, and his duty to speak out against the tyrannical influence of radical Islam, outweighed the court’s decision to place such strict limitations on his freedoms; a decision lent weight by the European Court of Human Rights’ rulings on the right to freedom of assembly.

    He judged, quite rightly, that in breaking his bail conditions he would treated far more harshly than we have seen radical Muslims treated. He was certain this would send a clear signal to anyone concerned about freedom of speech or about the influence of radical Islam in this country, that our freedoms are under attack, and the government, the courts, and the media are yet to wake up to the threat. In the worst cases, they’re even complicit in this attack on freedom.

    If anything, the fact that Tommy will spend the rest of the week in prison just confirms what many of us will have suspected for a long time: that the charges against him are motivated more by politics than they are by the desire to see justice done. That makes them all the more suspect.

    On June 24th, Blackburn Magistrates Court heard that on April 2nd 2011 Tommy had assaulted a man at a demonstration in Luton — a charge he denies. The court granted bail, but subject to the following conditions:

    He must not knowingly organise, travel to, or participate in any march, demonstration, protest or similar.
    He must not send any article, letter, fax or email that seeks to promote or publicise any match, demonstration or protest in the open air.
    He must report to Luton Police station every Saturday between midday and 2pm.

    Until the Tower Hamlets demonstration on September 3rd, he had dutifully complied with these restrictions — restrictions that are far more extensive than the ‘control orders’ placed on suspected ‘hate preachers’ or other Muslim radicals. Added to the threats he and his family have received (threats that the police thought serious enough to issue Osman warnings), the suffering that he has had to endure over the last few months may be easily imagined. It is hardly surprising that he feels let down by the legal system that the EDL have pledged to protect from radical Islam and from the creeping influence of Sharia Law.

    In Tower Hamlets Tommy made a very clear statement:

    “When you let me out of court with any bail conditions that restrict my democratic right to oppose militant Islam, I will break them the minute I walk out of that court room.”

    The question then becomes: is Tommy Robinson being held captive because he has dared to challenge the authority of the court (in the way that radical Muslims and supporters of Sharia Law do every day), or because he dared to challenge the government’s view that we should engage with, appease, and even fund militant Islam?

    What is more dangerous, the possibility that Tommy Robinson may inspire people with similar restrictions on their freedoms to violate their bail conditions, or that his example will once again underline the fact that the government’s counter-extremism strategies just don’t work?

    Tommy handed himself in to Luton police after the Tower Hamlets demonstration, but soon after was re-arrested on orders from Scotland Yard: a clear sign the government has played a role in deciding how the law ought to be applied.

    Tommy has been targeted not for what he has done, but for what he represents. He represents thousands of ordinary people who know that they’ve been lied to. They don’t suspect, they know. They know that radical Islam isn’t restricted to a few fanatics. They know that radical views are a problem across the Muslim community in Britain, and across the Muslim world. They know that in order to put an end to Islamic extremism we need to look at the causes, to take robust action, and to engage in an open public debate about what those causes are and what those actions should be.

    They know that it is ridiculous to refer to Islam as ‘the religion of peace’, given that an overwhelmingly disproportionate number of terrorist acts are committed not just by Muslims, but by Muslims who justify their actions with verses from the Qu’ran, and who cite the example of Mohammed as their inspiration.

    They know that they have been fed a politically correct understanding of Islam that is designed silence dissenting voices and prevent what we believe to be much-needed criticism of the Muslim Community’s continued inability to tackle radical Islam.

    At times this can lead to frustration, and tempers flare on either side. But there’s one thing we do know about the people of this country; and that is that together we actually form a remarkably tolerant society. We have a proud history of respecting the rights and freedoms of individuals, and whilst safeguards must always be put in place, there should be no reason to suspect that even the most vitriolic criticism of the causes of radical Islam would result in unfair discrimination or divided communities.

    But treating people like idiots, and demonising the dissenting voices, will lead to division. When the debate is reduced to nothing but a constant exchange of insults, it’s time to consider what action can be taken to change the way we go about things.

    This is not the state of play today, it is how things were two years ago, when the EDL first formed. We were fed up of radical Islam and we were fed up of inaction. But we were also fed up of how the criticism of radical Islam was suppressed, and how only someone educated at the right university, or with the right qualifications in ‘community cohesion’, or with a job at the BBC, was allowed to criticise Islam.

    We began giving a voice to legitimate criticism. We were quick to make clear that we reject all forms of extremism, and we worked tirelessly to ensure that the EDL attracted only decent, well-meaning supporters by taking every opportunity to explain what we stand for. At every stage, Tommy has led from the front.

    We have worked hard to disprove those critics who would call us ‘racists’ or ‘fascists’, but these criticisms keep coming. At some point you have to consider that these repeated accusations (or insults, as they have become), say more about the name-callers than they do the accused. But it would not be fair only to lay the blame at the opportunistic agitators of the far Left. Beyond the obvious falsehoods, (the accusations of ‘Islamophobia’ or Nazism, for example) there are slightly more subtle slurs that are employed by far more respectable members of the political and media establishments.

    Recently, Scotland Yard’s National Co-ordinator for Domestic Extremism, Adrian Tudway, wrote in an email to an as-yet-unnamed Muslim group:

    Read more »

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