Mark Steyn: Let’s Roll Over

“Tragic Events”

Mark Steyn: “We commemorate an act of war as a ‘tragic event,’ and we retreat to equivocation, cultural self-loathing, and utterly fraudulent misrepresentation about the events of the day”

Steyn discusses the widespread efforts to turn the 9/11 anniversary commemoration into something, anything different — a Hallmark holiday on which to tack any nice-sounding cause — to the detriment of remembering the attacks and their victims, and by extension, of discussing the ideology that drove the attackers.

“Let’s Roll Over,” by Mark Steyn for the National Review Online, September 10:

“Fresh Thinking”

In Australia, a Muslim terrorism suspect was so fearful of being criminalized and stereotyped in the post-9/11 epidemic of paranoia that he pulled a Browning pistol out of his pants and hit Sgt. Adam Wolsey of the Sydney constabulary. Fortunately, Judge Leonie Flannery acquitted him of shooting with intent to harm on the grounds that “‘anti-Muslim sentiment’ made him fear for his safety,” as Sydney’s Daily Telegraph reported on Friday.

Waiting to be interviewed on the radio the other day, I found myself on hold listening to a public-service message exhorting listeners to go to 911day.org and tell their fellow citizens how they would be observing the tenth anniversary of the, ah, “tragic events.” There followed a sound bite of a lady explaining that she would be paying tribute by going and cleaning up an area of the beach.

Great! Who could object to that? Anything else? Well, another lady pledged that she “will continue to discuss anti-bullying tactics with my grandson.”

Marvelous. Because studies show that many middle-school bullies graduate to hijacking passenger jets and flying them into tall buildings?

Whoa, ease up on the old judgmentalism there, pal. In New Jersey, many of whose residents were among the dead, middle-schoolers will mark the anniversary with a special 9/11 curriculum that will “analyze diversity and prejudice in U.S. history.” And, if the “9/11 Peace Story Quilt” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art teaches us anything, it’s that the “tragic events” only underline the “importance of respect.” And “understanding.” As one of the quilt panels puts it:

You should never feel left out
You are a piece of a puzzle
And without you
The whole picture can’t be seen.

And if that message of “healing and unity” doesn’t sum up what happened on Sept. 11, 2001, what does? A painting of a plane flying into a building? A sculpture of bodies falling from a skyscraper? Oh, don’t be so drearily literal. “It is still too soon,” says Midori Yashimoto, director of the New Jersey City University Visual Arts Gallery, whose exhibition “Afterwards & Forward” is intended to “promote dialogue, deeper reflection, meditation, and contextualization.” So, instead of planes and skyscrapers, it has Yoko Ono’s “Wish Tree,” on which you can hang little tags with your ideas for world peace.

What’s missing from these commemorations?

Firemen?

Oh, please. There are some pieces of the puzzle we have to leave out. As Mayor Bloomberg’s office has patiently explained, there’s “not enough room” at the official Ground Zero commemoration to accommodate any firemen. “Which is kind of weird,” wrote the Canadian blogger Kathy Shaidle, “since 343 of them managed to fit into the exact same space ten years ago.” On a day when all the fancypants money-no-object federal acronyms comprehensively failed — CIA, FBI, FAA, INS— the only bit of government that worked was the low-level unglamorous municipal government represented by the Fire Department of New York. When they arrived at the World Trade Center the air was thick with falling bodies — ordinary men and women trapped on high floors above where the planes had hit, who chose to spend their last seconds in one last gulp of open air rather than die in an inferno of jet fuel. Far “too soon” for any of that at New Jersey City University, but perhaps you could reenact the moment by filling out a peace tag for Yoko Ono’s “Wish Tree” and then letting it flutter to the ground.

Upon arrival at the foot of the towers, two firemen were hit by falling bodies. “There is no other way to put it,” one of their colleagues explained. “They exploded.”

Any room for that on the Metropolitan Museum’s “Peace Quilt”? Sadly not. We’re all out of squares. […]

And so we commemorate an act of war as a “tragic event,” and we retreat to equivocation, cultural self-loathing, and utterly fraudulent misrepresentation about the events of the day. In the weeks after 9/11, Americans were enjoined to ask, “Why do they hate us?” A better question is: “Why do they despise us?” And the quickest way to figure out the answer is to visit the Peace Quilt and the Wish Tree, the Crescent of Embrace and the Hole of Bureaucratic Inertia.

How are America’s allies remembering the real victims of 9/11? “Muslim Canucks Deal with Stereotypes Ten Years After 9/11,” reports CTV in Canada. And it’s a short step from stereotyping to criminalizing. “How the Fear of Being Criminalized Has Forced Muslims into Silence,” reports the Guardian in Britain. In Australia, a Muslim terrorism suspect was so fearful of being criminalized and stereotyped in the post-9/11 epidemic of paranoia that he pulled a Browning pistol out of his pants and hit Sgt. Adam Wolsey of the Sydney constabulary. Fortunately, Judge Leonie Flannery acquitted him of shooting with intent to harm on the grounds that “‘anti-Muslim sentiment’ made him fear for his safety,” as Sydney’s Daily Telegraph reported on Friday. That’s such a heartwarming story for this 9/11 anniversary they should add an extra panel to the peace quilt, perhaps showing a terror suspect opening fire on a judge as she’s pronouncing him not guilty and then shrugging off the light shoulder wound as a useful exercise in healing and unity.

What of the 23rd Psalm? It was recited by Flight 93 passenger Todd Beamer and the telephone operator Lisa Jefferson in the final moments of his life before he cried, “Let’s roll!” and rushed the hijackers.No, sorry. Aside from firemen, Mayor Bloomberg’s official commemoration hasn’t got any room for clergy, either, what with all the Executive Deputy Assistant Directors of Healing and Outreach who’ll be there. One reason why there’s so little room at Ground Zero is because it’s still a building site. As I write in my new book, 9/11 was something America’s enemies did to us; the ten-year hole is something we did to ourselves — and in its way, the interminable bureaucratic sloth is surely as eloquent as anything Nanny Bloomberg will say in his remarks.

In Shanksville, Pa., the zoning and permitting processes are presumably less arthritic than in Lower Manhattan, but the Flight 93 memorial has still not been completed. There were objections to the proposed “Crescent of Embrace” on the grounds that it looked like an Islamic crescent pointing towards Mecca. The defense of its designers was that, au contraire, it’s just the usual touchy-feely huggy-weepy pansy-wimpy multiculti effete healing diversity mush. It doesn’t really matter which of these interpretations is correct, since neither of them has anything to do with what the passengers of Flight 93 actually did a decade ago. 9/11 was both Pearl Harbor and the Doolittle Raid rolled into one, and the fourth flight was the only good news of the day, when citizen volunteers formed themselves into an ad hoc militia and denied Osama bin Laden what might have been his most spectacular victory. A few brave individuals figured out what was going on and pushed back within half an hour. But we can’t memorialize their sacrifice within a decade. And when the architect gets the memorial brief, he naturally assumes that there’s been a typing error and that “Let’s roll!” should really be “Let’s roll over!”

And so we commemorate an act of war as a “tragic event,” and we retreat to equivocation, cultural self-loathing, and utterly fraudulent misrepresentation about the events of the day. In the weeks after 9/11, Americans were enjoined to ask, “Why do they hate us?” A better question is: “Why do they despise us?” And the quickest way to figure out the answer is to visit the Peace Quilt and the Wish Tree, the Crescent of Embrace and the Hole of Bureaucratic Inertia.

Read it all.

Bolt Links:

“His views might be repugnant to most Muslims”
  Radical revert Abu Abdullah says 3000 incinerated people is just a drop in the ocean:

Steyn has put his finger on the pulse and told a few uncomfortable truths. 9/11 was no more a tragedy than Pearl Harbor or the Blitzkrieg. That was an act of war and the start of the Third Great Jihad carried out on the anniversary of the end of the Second Great Jihad. Acts of war aren’t tragedies, and the response to an act of war has to be overwhelming. But the wimps who make up the bulk of the population of the West have no stomach for an overwhelming response – indeed the hard Left is firmly in bed with the enemy – the modern day Quislings but only more stupid and blockheaded. It is no surprise that the last time we defeated an enemy soundly was back in 1945, because then we treated wars as they should be treated – it’s him or me, them or us – but today we go to war to merely capture the enemy and put him in court so he can put us on trial, or the futile ‘winning hearts and minds’ nonsense. But war isn’t about winning hearts and minds. it’s about winning and overwhelming the enemy. Our response to 9/11 will have lasted longer than both World Wars combined by next January. And why is that? It is because we haven’t fought to win. We have hamstrung our military by brainless rules of engagement. Instead of killing the enemy when you see him, we allow the enemy to escape unscathed, even when we see him planting roadside bombs, so not to ‘wake up the civilian population’ – that same civilian population that is indeed the enemy. Had this been 70 years ago, any enemy seen planting roadside bombs would have been shot dead, not allowed to go about his wicked business unmolested. And there’s nothing more brainless than the attitude that “If we resort to the enemies tactics, that makes us as bad as the enemy, and we’re better than that”. That is a cop out statement to try to justify doing nothing. We didn’t win World War II without being as ruthless as the enemy. If you’re not prepared to be ruthless, you’ll lose, and that is the history of warfare.

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OBAMA’S REVISED GUIDELINES FOR CELEBRATING 9/11

Just heard that President Obama at the last moment revived his guidelines for celebrating 9/11 today. Says the President “This should be a day of reflection, meditation and healing. We should start today by playing and replaying my Moslem outreach speech at Cairo. This should be followed by finding a Moslem in your neighborhood to hug and kiss and fawn over. To win over his trust and affection you tell him what a great religion Islam is; mention some of its magnificent cultural and scientific achievements (these can be found in my speech); then apologize and beg his forgiveness for Pam Geller, the Crusades, Israel’s occupation of the West Bank and oppression of Palestinians, and the invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan. This will promote interfaith harmony, peace and a More Perfect Union. Do these things and together with our Moslem brothers and sisters we can win the future and march forward to a better world.”