There is no such thing as "just a little" Sharia.

 Don’t worry, go back to sleep, infidel.

Reza Aslan says:

“No American Muslim, zero, absolutely none, not a single one has ever, ever called for the imposition of Shariah in America.”  (source)

While hapless Leftist pseudo-journalists continue to swallow his nonsense, he is being exposed at Jihad Watch as he never has been before.

But for all you incurable Islamophobes, here’s another dose of reality:

Germany: “The Islamic parallel justice system is becoming a threat to the constitutional legal system,” “the law is slipping out of our hands”

As has been the case in Britain, Sharia’s proponents got their foot in the door with pleas for just a little Sharia, just for a few community matters. Then, the reality hits that Sharia is a package deal: as even Imam Rauf has noted, “it is not possible in principle to limit the Shari’ah to some aspects of human life and leave out others.”

And so commences a process of “jurisdiction creeping.” There is no such thing as “just a little” Sharia. “Islamic ‘Arbitrators’ Shadow German Law,” by Maximillian Popp forDer Spiegel, September 1:

In mosques or tearooms, Muslim elders dispense verdicts that keep their communities in line. They mediate between aggrieved immigrants, sometimes at the expense of German justice. Some say the arbitrations ease caseloads in court, but others see the creeping advance of Sharia law.

The men ambushed Fuat S. on the street, then locked him in a basement and tortured him. Fuat was later admitted to the hospital in Berlin’s Neukölln district with gaping wounds, contusions and broken bones.

Police took his statement concerning the attack the same night. Fuat S., a gambler and a recipient of “Hartz IV” — Germany’s social welfare benefits for the long-term unemployed — gave a detailed statement. He’d conned an acquaintance, Mustafa O., out of €150,000 ($217,000) and the man was taking his revenge, Fuat said, together with his three brothers. They hit his hands, arms and knees with a hammer and threatened to shoot him.

The public prosecutor’s office in Berlin initiated proceedings against Mustafa O., a Palestinian man who had come to their attention repeatedly for violent acts. Police had investigated him in a number of cases, and now prosecutors saw an opportunity to convict a dangerous repeat offender. But when the case began, FuatS., the principle witness, unexpectedly withdrew his testimony. It was not Mustafa who had tortured him, he said, but an Albanian man he didn’t know. Mustafa, he said, wasn’t even in the basement at the time. This was clearly a lie, as police analysis of telephone data showed, but the judge was forced to acquit the defendant due to lack of evidence.

The decision, in fact, was reached by a different judge. According to police, the victim’s and the perpetrator’s families had met at a restaurant in the presence of an Islamic “justice of the peace,” an arbitrator who mediates conflicts between Muslims. The two families had reached a compromise: Fuat would drop the charges, and in exchange be relieved of part of his debt.

Helping to create conditions for the collapse of civil society:

According to Bernhard Mix, the public prosecutor in charge of the case, Fuat’s false testimony was part of a deal between the families. “It’s difficult to establish the truth using legal means, when the perpetrator and the victim reach an agreement,” he says.

Judges Without Laws

Politicians and social workers tend to focus on forced marriages and honor killings, but the baleful influence of these Islamic arbitrators has gone largely unnoticed by the public. Joachim Wagner, an author and television journalist of many years, has taken a closer look at the phenomenon in his book “Richter ohne Gesetz” (“Judges without Laws”). Reconstructing Mustafa O.’s case, he reaches the conclusion that “the Islamic parallel justice system is becoming a threat to the constitutional legal system.”

These justices of the peace don’t wear robes. Their courtrooms are mosques or teahouses. They draw their authority not from the law, but from their standing within the community. Most of them are senior members of their families, or imams, and some even fly in from Turkey or Lebanon to resolve disputes. Muslims seek them out when families argue, when daughters take up with nonbelievers or when clans clash. They often trust these arbitrators more than they trust the state.

The late juvenile court judge Kirsten Heisig drew attention to this problem a year ago: “The law is slipping out of our hands. It’s moving to the streets, or into a parallel system where an imam or another representative of the Koran determines what must be done.”

There is more.

2 thoughts on “There is no such thing as "just a little" Sharia.”

  1. ‘Muslims are the victims of 9/11’

    Push to ban Islamic law from Oklahoma court cases

    PETER CAVE: In the United States a controversial push to prohibit Oklahoma judges from considering Islamic law in deciding cases is going back to court the day after the 10th anniversary of 9/11.

    One of the groups backing an amendment to the state constitution to ban sharia law plans to campaign on the same issue in Australia.

    Muslim leaders in Oklahoma are fighting it, saying it violates their rights and stigmatises their faith.

    As Craig McMurtrie reports the row is particularly confronting for one 9/11 Muslim widow.

    CRAIG MCMURTRIE: September 11, 2001 turned Baraheen Ashrafi’s life and her approach to her religion upside down.

    BARAHEEN ASHRAFI: I don’t consider them as a Muslim. In Islam it doesn’t say to do anything, harm people.

    CRAIG MCMURTRIE: After 9/11 she covered up, deciding to wear a hijab or headscarf all the time. She felt suffocated in New York and decided to move to Oklahoma.

    BARAHEEN ASHRAFI: I don’t see that many people in here wearing hijab.

    CRAIG MCMURTRIE: She was a new mother and she was on her own.

    Baraheen Ashrafi’s husband who worked as a waiter at the top of the World Trade Centre’s North Tower died in the terrorist attack. His remains have never been recovered.

    BARAHEEN ASHRAFI: There’s so many people, they don’t know that Muslim was killed on that day.

    CRAIG MCMURTRIE: In the years that followed reported hate crimes against members of the Muslim community were almost unheard of in Oklahoma.

    But that changed last year. A public campaign was launched to amend the state constitution to prohibit judges from considering sharia law in their decisions.

    IMAD ENCHASSI: The most hate crime and the most threats we got was after the sharia law was blocked.

    CRAIG MCMURTRIE: Local Imam Imad Enchassi says it demonised Muslims and stigmatised his religion. He started to receive hate mail after a series of automated phone calls.

    IMAD ENCHASSI: The phone calls would say if you don’t vote yes for this law, as a woman in Oklahoma you will be stoned to death if you are caught committing adultery.

    CRAIG MCMURTRIE: Muslims make up less than 1 per cent of the state population. The imam says no-one had been pushing for courts to follow Islamic law.

    But proponents saw it as a pre-emptive strike. Brigitte Gabriel leads ACT! for America, a lobby group founded after the 9/11 attacks.

    BRIGITTE GABRIEL: We want to make sure Muslims in America, especially Muslim women in America will be protected under the law.

    CRAIG MCMURTRIE: She says her 175,000 members want to send a strong message to radicals and they’re extending the battle beyond Oklahoma to other US states and overseas – including Australia.

    BRIGITTE GABRIEL: Act for Australia is the latest. We are dealing with Australian individuals who are very interested in setting up a model that follows ACT! for America because obviously our model works, we have perfected how we do things. It’s like the McDonald’s franchise.

    CRAIG MCMURTRIE: Oklahoma voters overwhelmingly supported the ban on sharia law but a federal judge blocked it on appeal.

    The discrimination case is due back in court the day after September 11 which doesn’t make this 10th anniversary any easier for Baraheen Ashrafi.

    BARAHEEN ASHRAFI: I can’t explain it in any words but I wish, I want to see his face.

    CRAIG MCMURTRIE: In the midst of the row she’s reluctantly back in the limelight, reminding people that there were Muslim victims on 9/11.

    This is Craig McMurtrie for AM.

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