Abu Qatada: once again, he has made fools of us

Yesterday’s European Court ruling against the deportation of the Al Qaeda cleric Abu Qatada piles further insult on to a decade-long legal battle that has tied British courts in knots.

The Abu Qatada case proves it’s time to rethink human rights

As the European Court of Human Rights upholds Abu Qatada’s appeal, it undermines its own claim to authority. 

Abu Qatada, the jihadist cleric best known as Osama bin Laden’s “ambassador to Europe”, won a famous victory in Strasbourg, where the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) upheld his appeal against deportation from the UK to Jordan.

European Judges block UK from Deporting Bin Laden’s Right Hand Man (Pamela Geller)

Won again: Qatada was jailed after he was suspected of trying to leave the country – which Britain has been wanting for years. Abu Qatada lives with his family in a comfortable house paid for by citizens to whom he has also cost over 1 million pounds in legal expenses – and this isn’t even the highest price Britain has paid for this illegal ‘refugee.’

Britain has found itself hamstrung trying to get rid of a foreign national terrorist considered to be a risk to public safety. How has this come about?

Principally, it is to do with the warped application of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), which was drawn up after the Second World War as a response to the atrocities in Europe. The Abu Qatada saga is an affront to the enlightened attitudes that inspired the convention; it was never envisaged by its architects, many of them British, that it would end up making it impossible for democracies to defend themselves from those who would wish them harm.


Zealot who ran rings round the law

Abu Qatada, widely acknowledged as one of the most dangerous terrorists in the world, has spent the past ten years making a mockery of British justice.

In the process, he has cost the taxpayer more than £1million in legal fees, prison costs and other payouts. 

Meanwhile, his wife and five children – the last born shortly after 9/11 – have been free to live a comfortable western life on state handouts in a large London house.

Read more:  Evening Standard

Yesterdays story:

“In the absence of any assurance by Jordan that the torture evidence would not be used against Mr Othman, the Court therefore concluded that his deportation to Jordan to be retried would give rise to a flagrant denial of justice…” Never mind “Mr. Othman’s” own flagrant attempts to deny justice to innocent people by depriving them of their lives.

“Abu Qatada wins Jordan deportation appeal,” from the BBC, January 17

7 thoughts on “Abu Qatada: once again, he has made fools of us”

  1. I notice he is carrying the groceries, but then his wife’s freedom sack seems to be more like a straight jacket, I can see any sleeves! All I can I say is that I never knew they made sleeveless freedom sacks.

Comments are closed.