Muslim Brotherhood Report

The problem is not that Muslims lie, the problem is that we have politicians who believe them.

Muslim Brotherhood spokesman top dog Abdul Mawgoud Dadery lecturing U.S. on “moderate Islam” was under investigation for child pornography. (Investigative Project)

The Islam promo tour and the deception about the MB’s intentions continues regardless.

The TT has video of the MB taqiyya tour in the U.S.:


“The Muslim Brotherhood’s Mendacious Charm Campaign In Washington”

Washington Institute for Near East Policy scholar Eric Trager has written an article for The New Republic titled “The Muslim Brotherhood’s Mendacious Charm Campaign In Washington” that analyzes the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood’s recent visit to Washington. The article begins:

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace hosted a Muslim Brotherhood delegation in Washington last week to better understand how the Islamist group will govern Egypt. It was a noble attempt at promoting intercultural political dialogue—an engagement for which many in the American policy community, as well as academia, have long advocated. Yet the Brotherhood came to Washington with an agenda of its own: selling itself as a “moderate” organization to a highly skeptical American public. And it did so using one of the oldest sales tricks: It completely misrepresented itself. In a certain sense, the Muslim Brotherhood’s representatives had no other choice. If they admitted, for example, that they intend to repeal the law that criminalizes sexual harassment—as one of their female parliamentarians declared earlier last week—they would have killed their chances at winning over an American public that embraces gender equality. Similarly, if the Brotherhood’s representatives used their time in Washington to reiterate their leaders’ calls for banning beach tourism, it would have destroyed any hopes of an American taxpayer-aided bailout for the nearly bankrupt Egyptian economy. And if they’d repeated their leaders’ 9/11 conspiracy theories, they would have been on the first plane back to Cairo, rather than invited for meetings at the White House and State Department. Thus, the Brotherhood presented a version of its politics very different from the one that would be familiar to Egyptians.

Read the rest here.

Posts from last week reported on the visit by the Brotherhood delegation which was described as a “week long charm offensive  and which met with U.S. officials including White House national security staff.

“Muslims Inc: How Rich Is Khairat El-Shater?”

As a prohibited political group, the Brotherhood had a history of hiding its resources to protect them from confiscation. Members of the organisation living in exile – among them  Youssef Nada in Switzerland and Kamal El-Helbawy in London – were reportedly responsible for investment portfolios. El-Shater himself spent many time in the UK, Jordan and Saudi Arabia between the years 1981 and 1987, according to the official site Ikhwan Wiki.

Read the rest here.

However, there is still some resistance:

“There is an attempt by the old Mubarak regime to hijack the last stage of this transitional period and reproduce the old system of governance.” But this will certainly not be the end of the matter, for Ghorab is certainly correct that a “major crisis” is looming.

“Egypt disqualifies top Islamists, Mubarak VP from vote,” by Tom Perry and Dina Zayed for Reuters, April 14 via JW:

CAIRO (Reuters) – The race for the Egyptian presidency took a dramatic turn on Saturday when the authorities disqualified front-runners including Hosni Mubarak’s spy chief, a Muslim Brotherhood candidate and a Salafi cleric whose lawyer warned that “a major crisis” was looming.

The presidential election is the climax of a transition to civilian rule being led by the military council that assumed power from Mubarak on February 11, 2011 at the height of the uprising against his three decades in power.

The generals are due to hand power to the elected president on July 1.

The disqualifications add to the drama of a transition punctuated by spasms of violence and which is now mired in bitter political rivalries between once-banned Islamists, secular-minded reformists and remnants of the Mubarak order.

Farouk Sultan, head of the presidential election commission, told Reuters that a total of 10 of the 23 candidates had been disqualified from the race.

Hazem Salah Abu Ismail, the Salafi, was disqualified because his mother held U.S. citizenship, the state news agency reported, confirming previous reports fiercely denied by the Islamist cleric who says he the victim of a plot.

Abu Ismail’s lawyer, Nizar Ghorab, told Reuters he expected “a major crisis” in the next few hours.

The Muslim Brotherhood’s Khairat al-Shater was among those disqualified on Saturday. His spokesman said he would make use of a 48-hour window to challenge the decision.

Omar Suleiman, Mubarak’s intelligence chief and vice president in his last days in power, would also appeal, his spokesman said.

The elimination of three of the top candidates in what is being billed as Egypt’s first real presidential vote would redraw the electoral map just a few weeks before the vote gets under way in May. The election is expected to go to a June run-off between the top two candidates.

On Friday, Abu Ismail’s supporters besieged the headquarters of the election commission, forcing it to evacuate the premises and suspend its work. The building was guarded by security forces with riot shields.


Abu Ismail is a preacher and lawyer who has galvanized an enthusiastic support base with a message that mixes revolutionary zeal with hardline Islamism.

“The presidential committee has violated all the rules of law,” Abu Ismail said in remarks published on his Facebook page. “If the official decision is to violate the constitution, they should be able to deal with the consequences,” he said.

His candidacy had been in doubt since the election commission said it had received notification from U.S. authorities that his late mother had an American passport, a status that would disqualify him from the race.

Abu Ismail followers have hit the streets in protests to warn against any move to disqualify him. He denies his mother ever held dual nationality.

As for the Brotherhood’s Shater, his candidacy had been in doubt due to past criminal convictions widely seen as trumped up by the authorities due to political activities.

The Brotherhood, founded in 1928, has moved to the heart of public life since Mubarak was toppled. Anticipating Shater’s disqualification, the Brotherhood had nominated Mohamed Mursi, head of its political party, as a reserve candidate.

“We will not give up our right to enter the presidential race,” said Murad Muhammed Ali, Shater’s campaign manager.

“There is an attempt by the old Mubarak regime to hijack the last stage of this transitional period and reproduce the old system of governance.”

Shater had described Suleiman’s last minute decision to enter the race as an insult to the Egyptians who rose up against Mubarak. Suleiman says he is running to prevent Egypt turning into a religious state….