"Wilders horrifying vision of a fortress Europe"

Geert Wilders natural sense for elf-preservation, patriotism, courage and his  determination  to reverse the Islamization of Europe horrifies Islamic cultural enrichers:

The rise of the Right: Why liberals cannot afford to lose

Yasmin Qureshi and Dr Nafeez Ahmed

As the Eurozone crisis has teetered along the edge of disaster thanks to continued political and economic instability in Greece, Spain and Italy, the meteoric rise in the popularity of far-right political parties raises grave questions about Europe’s future.

Populist anger at economic mismanagement has led to unprecedented success for the extreme right in Greeceand France, along with the fall of a string of governmentssuch as Ireland, Portugal, Spain, Finland, Romania, Italy and the Netherlands – where the refusal of the far right Freedom Party to support Prime Minister Mark Rutte’s austerity measures in April led his minority coalition to collapse.

Previously, the Freedom Party’s 24 seats made it the third largest bloc in parliament, turning its founding leader Dutch MP Geert Wilders (pictured, right) into something of a kingmaker. Despite speculation that his sudden withdrawal from Rutte’s coalition would reduce his popularity, the opposite has happened. Exploiting the increasing unpopularity of austerity, Wilders’ call for budget decisions to be made not by the EU, but by domestic policymakers,  has led his Freedom Party to outstrip the ruling Liberal Party. However, as in France, these far right gains have been outweighed by an even more popular Socialist Party, which has just doubled its seats to 30.

But it is precisely the dogged persistence of the far right, despite the current overwhelming popularity of the Left, that is cause for concern. For as the case of Anders Breivik proves clearly, there has been an increasing crystallisation of far right discourse across the Atlantic. Among Breivik’s sources of inspiration, as evidenced by multiple salutary citations in his manifesto, are Geert Wilders himself, along with a range of US ultraconservative punditssuch as Robert Spencer, David Horowitz, Daniel Pipes, Pam Geller, among others.

In this context, Geert Wilders’ new book, Marked for Death: Islam’s War Against the West and Me, released last month in New York is worth reading as a window into contemporary far right ideology.  The book is published by leading ultraconservative outlet Regnery, which happens to publish many of the same US Islamophobes identified above – and who between themselves have funded Wilders’ Freedom Party.

So what is Wilders’ vision for Europe, and the world? To get to this, one has to trawl through to about the last third of his book. The earlier chapters consist largely of two elements – Wilders’ personal story of being subjected to death threats from Muslim extremists, for which he has had to live under extraordinary security conditions (which is of course highly lamentable); and regurgitations of stale misinterpretations of Islamic history and theology previously promoted by the likes of Wilders’ co-authors at Regnery, and largely discreditedby mainstream scholarship.

“Misinterpretations, discredited”– note that Islam apologists  always avoid telling us how exactly the texts, the history and the facts are ‘discredited’…..

Along the way, Wilders reiterates his call for the Qur’an to be banned, and for Muslims to renounce Islam – a position that throws fuel to the fire of extremism and undermines moderates. He for instance criticises the Organisation for Islamic Cooperation (OIC), the intergovernmental body of 57 Muslim member states, for seeking to “elevate Shari’ah Laws over human rights” through the Cairo Declaration, but ignores how the OIC has since 2005, under the leadership of Secretary-General Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, been serious about Muslim reform. One of the first things Ihsanoglu did through the OIC was establish the world’s first Muslim human rights commission to investigate abuses of internationally-recognised “civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights” in Muslim countries.

BS. Ihsanoghlu is all about muzzling freedom of speech. There are no human rights for kafirs under Islam.

While flaws and limitations do exist, at this critical stage the new OIC human rights commission requires not blanket dismissal, but robust support. As one high-level UN representative remarks: “I am optimistic as regards the Commission – as long as it receives the right technical support.”

But Wilders will have none of it. Instead he wants the West to cut all aid to the Muslim world, even those struggling under the Arab spring – although development experts warn that continuing inequalities and social marginalisation in these regions, combined with political corruption, are key ingredients in allowing violent extremists to recruit to their ideological causes.

Cutting off aid  (jiziya)  to Muselmanic parasites is a long overdue first step. If their system is superior to the free market economy, they had a 1400 year head start. Let the Muselworld steam in their own juices and put our money into defence!

By the end of Marked for Death, we see what Wilders is leading up to – a horrifying vision of a fortress Europe, defending “freedom” through the deployment of totalitarian state powers to expunge Islam from the continent. His recommendations are reminiscent of the discriminatory social control measures taken against Jews and other minorities under Nazi Germany in the 1930s.

Wilders, of course, is careful to disavow violence and reiterate he hates Islam, not Muslims. But it is difficult to deny the implicitly violent subtext of his sweeping proposals, including a halt to all Muslim immigration, payments to settled immigrants to leave, cessation of building of mosques, and taxation of Muslim religious practices such as the headscarf. Most disturbing is his endorsement of Israeli-style “administrative detention” (indefinite internment without trial on security grounds) in Europe as part of criminal operations in Muslim communities; not to mention the forcible deportation of tens of millions of Muslims from Europe for “thinking” about “crime” or “Shari’ah”.

Of course, the rise of the far right is by no means a foregone conclusion. In Spain and Italy, despite a wave of opposition to brutal austerity measures, recent elections saw parties of far right persuasion lose seats and credibility. Here in the UK, although the Mayoral electionssaw major losses for the coalition parties accompanied by gains for Labour, far right parties won not a single Assembly seat.

But it would be premature for progressives to rejoice. Mainstream parties have still failed to grasp just how ill-conceived austerity is as a response to deepening recession, and are running out of ideas. European progressives might be winning today’s electoral battles – but if they fail to tackle unemployment, create economic opportunities, and reduce inequalities, then we will lose the war. And if that happens, extremists like Geert Wilders may find themselves filling the vacuum in the aftermath.

 

The Rise of the Right

Why Liberals Cannot Afford to Lose

By Yasmin Qureshi and Nafeez Mosaddeq Ahmed

 

As theEurozone crisishas teetered along the edge of disaster thanks to continued political and economic instability inGreece, Spain and Italy, the meteoric rise in the popularity of far right political parties raises grave questions about Europe’s future.

Populist anger at economic mismanagement has led to unprecedented success for the extreme right inGreeceandFrance, along with thefall of a string of governmentssuch as Ireland, Portugal, Spain, Finland, Romania, Italy and the Netherlands – where therefusalof the far right Freedom Party to support Prime Minister Mark Rutte’s austerity measures in April led his minority coalition to collapse.

Previously, the Freedom Party’s 24 seats made it the third largest bloc in parliament, turning its founding leader Dutch MP Geert Wilders into something of akingmaker. Despite speculation that his sudden withdrawal from Rutte’s coalition would reduce his popularity, the opposite has happened. Exploiting theincreasing unpopularity of austerity, Wilders’ call for budget decisions to be made not by the EU, but by domestic policymakers,has led his Freedom Party tooutstripthe ruling Liberal Party. However, as in France, these far right gains have been outweighed by an even more popular Socialist Party, which has just doubled its seats to 30.

But it is precisely the dogged persistence of the far right, despite the current overwhelming popularity of the left, that is cause for concern. For as the case of Anders Breivik proves clearly, there has been an increasing crystallisation of far right discourse across the Atlantic. Among Breivik’s sources of inspiration, as evidenced by multiple salutary citations in his manifesto, areGeert Wildershimself, along with a range of USultraconservativepunditssuch asRobert Spencer, David Horowitz, Daniel Pipes, Pam Geller, among others.

In this context, Geert Wilders’ new book,Marked for Death: Islam’s War Against the West and Me,released last month in New York is worth reading as a window into contemporary far right ideology.The book is published by leading ultraconservative outlet Regnery, which happens to publish many of the same US Islamophobes identified above – and who between themselves havefundedWilders’ Freedom Party.

So what is Wilders’ vision for Europe, and the world? To get to this, one has to trawl through to about the last third of his book. The earlier chapters consist largely of two elements – Wilders’ personal story of being subjected to death threats from Muslim extremists, for which he has had to live under extraordinary security conditions (which is of course highly lamentable); and regurgitations ofstale misinterpretationsof Islamic history and theology previously promoted by the likes of Wilders’ co-authors at Regnery, andlargely discreditedbymainstream scholarship.

Along the way, Wilders reiterates his call for the Qur’an to be banned, and for Muslims to renounce Islam – a position that throws fuel to the fire of extremism and undermines moderates. He for instance criticises the Organisation for Islamic Cooperation (OIC), the intergovernmental body of 57 Muslim member states, for seeking to “elevateShari’ah Lawsover human rights” through the Cairo Declaration, but ignores how the OIC has since 2005, under the leadership of Secretary-General Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, been serious about Muslim reform. One of the first things Ihsanoglu did through the OIC was establish theworld’s first Muslim human rights commissionto investigate abuses of internationally-recognised “civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights” in Muslim countries.

While flaws and limitations do exist, at this critical stage the new OIC human rights commission requires not blanket dismissal, but robust support. Asone high-level UN representativeremarks: “I am optimistic as regards the Commission – as long as it receives the right technical support.”

But Wilders will have none of it. Instead he wants the West to cut all aid to the Muslim world, even those struggling under the Arab spring – althoughdevelopment expertswarn that continuing inequalities and social marginalisation in these regions, combined with political corruption, are key ingredients in allowing violent extremists to recruit to their ideological causes.

By the end ofMarked for Death, we see what Wilders is leading up to – a horrifying vision of a fortress Europe, defending “freedom” through the deployment of totalitarian state powers to expunge Islam from the continent. His recommendations are reminiscent of the discriminatory social control measures taken against Jews and other minorities under Nazi Germany in the 1930s.

Wilders, of course, is careful to disavow violence and reiterate he hates Islam, not Muslims. But it is difficult to deny the implicitly violent subtext of his sweeping proposals, includinga halt to all Muslim immigration, payments to settled immigrants to leave, cessation of building of mosques, and taxation of Muslim religious practices such as the headscarf.Most disturbing is his endorsement of Israeli-style “administrative detention” (indefinite internment without trial on security grounds) in Europe as part of criminal operations in Muslim communities; not to mention theforcible deportationof tens of millions of Muslims from Europe for “thinking” about “crime” or “Shari’ah”.

Of course, the rise of the far right is by no means a foregone conclusion. InSpain and Italy, despite a wave of opposition to brutal austerity measures, recent elections saw parties of far right persuasion lose seat

As theEurozone crisishas teetered along the edge of disaster thanks to continued political and economic instability inGreece, Spain and Italy, the meteoric rise in the popularity of far right political parties raises grave questions about Europe’s future.Populist anger at economic mismanagement has led to unprecedented success for the extreme right inGreeceandFrance, along with thefall of a string of governmentssuch as Ireland, Portugal, Spain, Finland, Romania, Italy and the Netherlands – where therefusalof the far right Freedom Party to support Prime Minister Mark Rutte’s austerity measures in April led his minority coalition to collapse.

Previously, the Freedom Party’s 24 seats made it the third largest bloc in parliament, turning its founding leader Dutch MP Geert Wilders into something of akingmaker. Despite speculation that his sudden withdrawal from Rutte’s coalition would reduce his popularity, the opposite has happened. Exploiting the increasing unpopularity of austerity, Wilders’ call for budget decisions to be made not by the EU, but by domestic policymakers,  has led his Freedom Party tooutstripthe ruling Liberal Party. However, as in France, these far right gains have been outweighed by an even more popular Socialist Party, which has just doubled its seats to 30.

But it is precisely the dogged persistence of the far right, despite the current overwhelming popularity of the left, that is cause for concern. For as the case of Anders Breivik proves clearly, there has been an increasing crystallisation of far right discourse across the Atlantic. Among Breivik’s sources of inspiration, as evidenced by multiple salutary citations in his manifesto, areGeert Wildershimself, along with a range of USultraconservativepunditssuch asRobert Spencer, David Horowitz, Daniel Pipes, Pam Geller, among others.

In this context, Geert Wilders’ new book,Marked for Death: Islam’s War Against the West and Me, released last month in New York is worth reading as a window into contemporary far right ideology.  The book is published by leading ultraconservative outlet Regnery, which happens to publish many of the same US Islamophobes identified above – and who between themselves havefundedWilders’ Freedom Party.

So what is Wilders’ vision for Europe, and the world? To get to this, one has to trawl through to about the last third of his book. The earlier chapters consist largely of two elements – Wilders’ personal story of being subjected to death threats from Muslim extremists, for which he has had to live under extraordinary security conditions (which is of course highly lamentable); and regurgitations ofstale misinterpretationsof Islamic history and theology previously promoted by the likes of Wilders’ co-authors at Regnery, andlargely discreditedbymainstream scholarship.

Along the way, Wilders reiterates his call for the Qur’an to be banned, and for Muslims to renounce Islam – a position that throws fuel to the fire of extremism and undermines moderates. He for instance criticises the Organisation for Islamic Cooperation (OIC), the intergovernmental body of 57 Muslim member states, for seeking to “elevateShari’ah Lawsover human rights” through the Cairo Declaration, but ignores how the OIC has since 2005, under the leadership of Secretary-General Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, been serious about Muslim reform. One of the first things Ihsanoglu did through the OIC was establish theworld’s first Muslim human rights commissionto investigate abuses of internationally-recognised “civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights” in Muslim countries.

While flaws and limitations do exist, at this critical stage the new OIC human rights commission requires not blanket dismissal, but robust support. Asone high-level UN representativeremarks: “I am optimistic as regards the Commission – as long as it receives the right technical support.”

But Wilders will have none of it. Instead he wants the West to cut all aid to the Muslim world, even those struggling under the Arab spring – althoughdevelopment expertswarn that continuing inequalities and social marginalisation in these regions, combined with political corruption, are key ingredients in allowing violent extremists to recruit to their ideological causes.

By the end ofMarked for Death, we see what Wilders is leading up to – a horrifying vision of a fortress Europe, defending “freedom” through the deployment of totalitarian state powers to expunge Islam from the continent. His recommendations are reminiscent of the discriminatory social control measures taken against Jews and other minorities under Nazi Germany in the 1930s.

Wilders, of course, is careful to disavow violence and reiterate he hates Islam, not Muslims. But it is difficult to deny the implicitly violent subtext of his sweeping proposals, including a halt to all Muslim immigration, payments to settled immigrants to leave, cessation of building of mosques, and taxation of Muslim religious practices such as the headscarf. Most disturbing is his endorsement of Israeli-style “administrative detention” (indefinite internment without trial on security grounds) in Europe as part of criminal operations in Muslim communities; not to mention theforcible deportationof tens of millions of Muslims from Europe for “thinking” about “crime” or “Shari’ah”.

Of course, the rise of the far right is by no means a foregone conclusion. InSpain and Italy, despite a wave of opposition to brutal austerity measures, recent elections saw parties of far right persuasion lose seats and credibility. Here in the UK, although theMayoral electionssaw major losses for the coalition parties accompanied by gains for Labour, far right parties won not a single Assembly seat.

But it would be premature for progressives to rejoice. Mainstream parties have still failed to grasp just how ill-conceived austerity is as a response to deepening recession, and are running out of ideas. European progressives might be winning today’s electoral battles – but if they fail to tackle unemployment, create economic opportunities, and reduce inequalities, then we will lose the war. And if that happens, extremists like Geert Wilders may find themselves filling the vacuum in the aftermath.

s and credibility. Here in the UK, although theMayoral electionssaw major losses for the coalition parties accompanied by gains for Labour, far right parties won not a single Assembly seat.

But it would be premature for progressives to rejoice. Mainstream parties have still failed to grasp just how ill-conceived austerity is as a response to deepening recession, and are running out of ideas. European progressives might be winning today’s electoral battles – but if they fail to tackle unemployment, create economic opportunities, and reduce inequalities, then we will lose the war. And if that happens, extremists like Geert Wilders may find themselves filling the vacuum in the aftermath.

Yasmin Qureshi and Dr Nafeez Ahmed

Yasmin Qureshi is the Member of Parliament for Bolton South East. She is Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on International Justice and a Member of the Justice Select Committee. Prior to entering politics, Yasmin was a Barrister for the Crown Prosecution Service later working in private practice. In 2000-2002 she worked for the United Nations Missions in Kosovo heading and co-ordinating the Criminal Legal Unit. From 2004-2008 she was Human Rights Adviser to Mayor of London Ken Livingstone, working on issues related to economic and civil rights, as well as campaigning on anti-terrorism legislation. Dr Nafeez Ahmed is a bestselling author and political scientist whose research was used by the 9/11 Commission. He is Executive Director of the Institute for Policy Research & Development, and has taught international relations theory, contemporary history, empire, and globalization at the School of Global Studies, University of Sussex and Brunel University’s Politics & History Unit. Dr. Ahmed is also Strategy Director for Creative Education at Arts Versa Consultants, where he has consulted for projects funded by the Department of Communities and Local Government and the US Embassy in London; he has also advised the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.

Stop the world, I wanna get off! We are so infiltrated its a joke!

 So lets take a closer look at who is behind this drivel: 

We have a ‘Bolton MP’, a Paki female by the name of  Yasmin”Qureshi”, meaning her forcibly converted Hindu ancestors adopted the ideology of their conquerers to such an extent that they claim lineage to Muhammad’s tribe, the Qureish, just like Elizabeth Warren claims to have Cherokee (not a drop) lineage because it helps her getting an  (unfair)  affirmative action advantage.

As a lawmaker Bolton MP Yasmin Qureshi doesn’t have much respect or regard for the law; she was banned from driving over mobile phone violations (Killer “Lord” Ahmed come to mind) and the whole thing becomes ever more smelly the closer we get. But it shows us once again: they (muslims, gait-props from the ummah)  are watching us very carefully and they know all about how our system works in order to bring it down. Its high time we learn something about them.

Then there is the  conspiracy-mongering  Nafeez Ahmed, aptly described by Christopher Hitchens as a “one-room sideshow” –  here. And yes, Nafeez Ahmed is not only a trufer, he is one of the ‘truf’-manufacturers, “Bush did 9/11”- good grief!

Out with this filth!

7 thoughts on “"Wilders horrifying vision of a fortress Europe"”

  1. of course the muselputz sharia finance systems are deeply flawed, which is why they need our finances to survive,

  2. Didn’t have the stomach to read the verbal effluent emanating from the islamo-faschists, but I just want to recommend Geert Wilders “Marked for Death” – it’s a page turner! Buy it! Alone the intro by Steyn is worth the price.

  3. I reject their assertion, that Wilders et co. were largely discredited. I expected to see a long list of think tanks and organization, and they cite, ONE source. One, and it was a Muslim organization. I don’t care that it was at Cambridge. So essentially, Muslims defending Muslim imperialism.

    In the report, the authors replaced Islam with spirituality and state, “Fears that spirituality would lead to a return to a backward past are unfounded.” Ha. I know the authors weren’t aiming for comedy, but what a joke. Were ever Muslims go they bring their backwards scummy culture and traditions with them.

  4. I agree with GW on just about everything except that Muslims can or will renounce Islam, except one or two once in a great while, and that “religious” Islam can be separated from the rest of it. It ain’t gonna happen. Unless something drastic happens, I see Europe collapsing into Islamic chaos within the next five years. Denial is the only thing saying that it’s not happening now.

  5. We are hamstrung by counterfeit human rights legislation which Islamic countries and their lackeys in the UN have foisted upon us; a fantastic burden which Muslims reject for themselves, but which they demand we adhere to religiously.

    Thus we have 30 million fake refugees and un-entitled asylum seekers from Africa, Asia and the ME, mostly unassimilable, hostile Muselmaniacs who have no intention to pull their weight, but to place demands upon demands on us while breeding furiously and bringing their extended tribes into a welfare system that was never meant for them.

    The coming crash will show wether we can ditch the phoney moral ballast and break free again.

    “Nationalism is simply the determination of a people to cultivate its own soul, to follow the customs bequeathed to it by its ancestors, to develop its traditions according to its own instincts. It is the national equivalent of the individual’s determination not to be a slave.” – Rebecca West, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, 1935

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