Whose Hands Are Tied?

Not a minute for Jews:

Ankie Spitzer, whose husband Andre was one of the athletes massacred in the Munich Games n 1972, told the European Jewish Press that Jacques Rogge, president of the London Organizing Committee of the Olympic Games, told her that his “hands were tied” by the admission of 46 Arab and Muslim members to the International Olympic Committee.

She replied, “My husband’s hands were tied, not yours.”

But the answer from the IOC is “no.”

Think of it: The United States, Canada, Germany and Israel have insufficient international influence to obtain, in the sporting arena of international “brotherhood,” one minute of respect for the memory of 11 Israeli victims of what we persist in calling “terrorism.”

Munich, 40 Years Later

Gold Medal Dhimmitude

by Diana West

The Israeli Olympic team, Munich 1972

The stilted conversation the world is having over the IOC refusal to permit a minute of silence at the opening of the 2012 London Olympic to mark the Munich massacre 40 years ago is a turning point in the Islamization of the international arena.

As the Chicago Tribune reports:

The idea of a remembrance has gained more traction this year than ever before.   The White House is for it.  The U.S. House and Senate have supported it in resolutions.  So have the Canadian and German parliaments, the German foreign minister and 30 German athletes. And the government of Israel, from its prime minister to deputy foreign minister, has for the first time become publicly involved in asking for a minute of silence.

President Obama threw his support behind an online petition for the minute of silence that now has more than 103,000 signatures.

“Yes, we absolutely support the campaign for a minute of silence at the Olympics to honor the Israeli athletes killed in Munich,” said National Security Council spokesman Tommy Vietor.

But the answer from the IOC is “no.”

Think of it: The United States, Canada, Germany and Israel have insufficient international influence to obtain, in the sporting arena of international “brotherhood,” one minute of respect for the memory of 11 Israeli victims of what we persist in calling “terrorism.” In fact, this was an early attack of resurgent jihad.

And therein lies the problem. What we are witnessing is more than a  measure of the clout of nations in which the United States and a pathetically small handful of allies come up short. It is the definition of “terrorism” itself that is under contention. In the world of Islam, the 1972 attack by Fatah’s Black September terrorists, committed with the support of PLO/PA leaders, is not an outrage against civilization, it’s a successful “operation.” To this day, these murderers are officially revered in the Palestinian Authority and elsewhere in the Islamic world as “shahids,” or Islamic martyrs. Indeed, murdering Israelis is religiously permitted under Islam.

Long before we surrendered one minute of silence for the atheletes and a German policeman killed in the attack, we agreed to perpetual silence on these terrible facts about Islam and jihad. Now, such appalling barbarities do not even enter the quiet sputtering over the IOC’s refusal to respect the Olympic war dead.

The terrorist-worshipping PA will field an Olympic team — in itself an offense against civilization. And this is to be applauded by an IOC leadership that in addition to its usual contingent of European princelings and Jean-Claude Killy, also includes an expanding contingent from the Islamic world. With 46 Islamic nations sending teams to London, practically the whole OIC will be on the field. And that’s exactly what Olympics chief Jacques Rogge meant when he said his “hands were tied” in response to the request from the Munich widows.

From Israel National News:

Ankie Spitzer, whose husband Andre was one of the athletes massacred in the Munich Games n 1972, told the European Jewish Press that Jacques Rogge, president of the LondonOrganizing Committee of the Olympic Games, told her  that his “hands were tied” by the admission of 46 Arab and Muslim members to the International Olympic Committee.

She replied, “My husband’s hands were tied, not yours.”

Rogge has tied his own hands. Out of fear of giving offense to Islam, out of fear of a mass display of Islamic aggrievement, Rogge is yielding to the Islamic way.  In doing so, he is also yielding fundamentals of Western morality. But so is every go-along-to-get-along country participating in this charade. Rather than make the minute of silence for slain Israelis a simple condition of participation in the opening ceremonies, Rogge, the IOC and the full roster of acquiescing nations are implicitly accepting the Islamic narrative that the 1972 jihad massacre of Jews on German soil was inded the successful Munich “operation.”

We have all  tied our hands now. Will we ever break free?