“Death Threats Shouldn’t Be Taken As Actual Threats When Made by Arab Muslims”

Malik Juweid: “Wishing Death Upon Someone Shouldn’t Be Taken As An Actual Threat” 

A University of Iowa professor said his erratic behavior and unprofessional conduct can be explained by cultural differences and by the mental stress he suffered working at the UI.

Why was Malik Juweid dismissed? It must have been something serious, for he had tenure. Juweid can’t believe it; he thought tenure meant he could get away with absolutely anything, and everything.

Though Malik Juweid now, from Jordan, accuses Dean Lois Geist of making death threats to him, last summer, in an Iowa court hearing with a three-man judicial panel, Malik Juweid — via Skype from Jordan – freely admitted it was he who made the death threats to her, but that they didn’t count because in Arab culture death threats are routinely made, and are not to be taken seriously. It’s an Arab thang, and Americans and other hyper-sensitive Infidels should not be so quick to take offense or to worry. After all, is there any indication, anywhere, that Muslims and Arabs actually act on these death threats, are unusually violent and aggressive in their behavior, can suddenly turn even on those who are trying to help them, to fight for them?Malik Juweid: “Wishing Death Upon Someone Shouldn’t Be Taken As An Actual Threat”

2 thoughts on ““Death Threats Shouldn’t Be Taken As Actual Threats When Made by Arab Muslims””

  1. Wanting to kill you is the only truth a Muslim will ever tell you.

    Lying that they didn’t really mean it afterwards, that is a part of it too.

  2. Death-threats and extortion are part of islam, and are in the Qur’an, so they’re “protected, religious” hate-speech, unlike ordinary hate-speech.

    ;-)

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