Generous UK: Paki jihadists given $47 million in legal aid to fund their defense

‘Criminal legal aid costs one billion a year, and at a time like this, you have to challenge whether we are getting appropriate value for taxpayers’ money.’

Its criminal to burden the British taxpayer with this unjustifiable, absurd squandering of scarce resources. Imagine how much good the British government could do if it allocated that much money to the counter jihad!

UK: Al-Qaeda jihad bomb plot gangs given $47 million in legal aid to fund their defense

When Kevin Carroll and Tommy Robinson receive $47 million in legal aid, I will stop saying that the British legal system is biased against them and in favor of jihadists and Islamic supremacists.

“Al Qaeda bomb plot gangs were handed £30m in legal aid to fund their defence,” by James Slack in the Daily Mail, January 21 (thanks to Pamela Geller):

Two gangs of Al Qaeda terrorists who plotted to inflict mass murder on the British public shared more than £30million in legal aid, it emerged last night.

Figures released by the Ministry of Justice show the astonishing sums being paid out by taxpayers to fund defence in criminal cases.

Recipients of huge amounts include the July 21 bombers, a group of Islamist fanatics behind the 2006 airline liquid bomb plot and a string of fraud cases.

The former fugitive Asil Nadir – who rented a £23,000-a-month London residence during his trial – received more than £1million in legal aid.

‘Suffolk Strangler’ Steven Wright, who murdered five prostitutes in Ipswich, was given £444,220 to pay for his defence.

Justice Secretary Chris Grayling said of the revelations: ‘Of course everyone deserves a defence.

‘But when you look at costs involved in some cases, you have to ask whether we can afford to provide this level of support in criminal trials.

‘Criminal legal aid costs one billion a year, and at a time like this, you have to challenge whether we are getting appropriate value for taxpayers’ money.’

A breakdown published by Mr Grayling’s department details the most expensive legal aid cases in each of the last five financial years.

In 2007/08, the July 21 terrorism trial swallowed £7.1million. Muktar Ibrahim, Ramzi Mohammed, Yassin Omar and Hussain Osman were convicted of attempting to blow themselves up on the London transport network just two weeks after the 7/7 atrocity in 2005.

The four men tried to mirror the previous attack but their rucksacks, packed with explosives, failed to detonate. At their trial in 2007, they claimed it was a deliberate hoax to protest over the war in Iraq.

The following year the eight defendants in an alleged conspiracy to launch suicide bomb attacks on a succession of transatlantic airliners, using liquid bombs, cost £12.2million in legal aid. The plot led to draconian restrictions on what could be taken on flights.

The first jury failed to reach a verdict in the case – leading to re-trials which swallowed a further £14.8million. Ultimately, seven out of the eight original suspects were found guilty of conspiracy to murder….