Australia: Islamic Council of Victoria Praises Uni For “Mature Response” to Gender Segregation

Submission to Islamic mores is appreciated.  Muselmaniacs  demands are never “divisive”, like a Geert Wilders visit. Opposing views by those who disagree with the Islamisation of Australia are condemned:

In a statement, ICV secretary Ghaith Krayem praised Professor Davis’s stance  for segregation at events held on campus.

“There is nothing unreasonable in the practices of the events in question; indeed, segregation according to gender is a common practice across many respectable institutions in Australia,” he said.  (Full article below the fold)

The boats are only illegal if Labor says so

 Trioli Grub

Get your toddler brainwashed here

(Andrew Bolt)

Put the Left in charge of your toddler, and they’ll soon have the little tackers not reading but chanting slogans:

Despite not being old enough to read or write, about 40 children have been used by teachers at Summer Hill Children’s Centre to sign and post a letter to Prime Minister Julia Gillard and Opposition Leader Tony Abbott, seeking a pay rise for their minders…

Finance Minister Penny Wong gives away the truth about those “declining revenues” the Government is blaming for its deficits….

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Islamic council backs uni gender response

Rachel Baxendale/The Australian

THE Islamic Council of Victoria has expressed its appreciation for the “mature response” from the University of Melbourne to The Australian’s report that public events held by Islamic organisations at the university had been segregated on the basis of gender.

The council said yesterday there was “no basis for condemning seating arrangements at a privately organised event, which are within the confines of both domestic law and international human rights”.

On April 13, a lecture entitled “Islamic rulings on Jihad in Syria & why great scholars’ silence” (sic) was held in the university’s Copland Theatre by Islamic education organisation Hikmah Way. At the entrance to the lecture, attended by The Australian, signs directed “sisters” to the back and “brothers” to the front.

The university was contacted about the issue last Tuesday, and on Thursday released a statement saying the lecture had been held by a non-university organisation and run as an external event.

The statement did not address The Australian’s questions about the university’s policy on gender equality and how this may or may not apply to external events.

But on Sunday Vice-Chancellor Glyn Davis penned a cautious piece in The Conversation, in which he made it clear he did not support gender segregation at public events on campus.

“In hindsight, the university poorly communicated its expectations when providing space on campus,” Professor Davis said.

“Hiring venues is a commercial transaction. The university needs to ensure the law, and its own policies, will not be broken by activities on campus. The standard University of Melbourne venue hire rules took for granted, rather than spelled out, requirements for equality when people use a university location. This omission will be addressed.”

Professor Davis framed the issue as “a clash of principles, not just a case of discrimination”.

“Equality of the sexes is a key value — and so is toleration of religious practice,” he said.

In a statement, ICV secretary Ghaith Krayem praised Professor Davis’s stance without addressing his lack of support for segregation at events held on campus.

“There is nothing unreasonable in the practices of the events in question; indeed, segregation according to gender is a common practice across many respectable institutions in Australia,” he said.

In the wake of condemnation of the practice fromTony Abbott, opposition parliamentary secretary for the status of women Michaelia Cash and the federal minister, Julie Collins, Mr Krayem said he would like to remind the Opposition Leader of Australia’s commitment to freedom of religion.

In contrast, the director of the National Centre of Excellence for Islamic Studies at the University of Melbourne, Abdullah Saeed, said the university could set its own policies on how its facilities should be used by external parties. “Gender equality is an important part of the university’s policies and users need to keep an eye on such policies,” he said.

2 thoughts on “Australia: Islamic Council of Victoria Praises Uni For “Mature Response” to Gender Segregation”

  1. Fat tard so 50% of the population are second class, what a wanker

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