Afghanistan: Pro-Sharia lawmakers block law criminalizing child marriage and banning prosecution of rape victims for adultery

Well, you can see their point. Pedophilia plus sharia is sacred and holy.

Building a modern nation for a bunch of illiterate third world savages is not working. Not for them and even less for us. Especially not under sharia:


Afghanistan: Pro-Sharia lawmakers block law criminalizing child marriage and banning prosecution of rape victims for adultery  (JW)

This AP story uses “conservative” to refer to the pro-Sharia Muslims who blocked this women’s rights law. That’s in accord with common journalistic practice, which refers to religious people of any religion as “conservative” and to more secular types as “liberal.” The common journalistic practice runs into a contradiction, however, with the global alliance between Islamic supremacists and the forces of the Left. That leads the mainstream media to term opponents of Sharia “right-wing” and even “far-right,” their all-purpose term to semaphore to readers that we are bad people and decent folks should stay away from us. But that means that in the U.S., opponents of Sharia are “conservatives,” while in Afghanistan, proponents of Sharia are “conservatives.” If ever (and this will never happen) a counter-jihad, anti-Sharia movement arose in Afghanistan, AP’s collective head would explode.


Afghan MPs block divisive women’s rights law

Again, the word “conservative” is used for radical headbangers, who are therefore perceived as the savage version of Tea-Partiers. And “divisive” is this other BS-word that stinks out the room like a dead fish. Islam has divided the world in haram and halal, and until the last AP scribbler understands that no progress can be made.

Anyway, note that the Sharia supremacists block a law banning child marriage. This is because Muhammad consummated his marriage with Aisha when he was 54 and she was 9, and he is the supreme example for conduct (cf. Qur’an 33:21), so his example is normative and cannot be questioned. And the law also would have prevented the prosecution of rape victims — one of the most noxious manifestations of the fact that in Islamic law, men are not called upon to exercise any self-control at all. Their conduct is entirely the woman’s responsibility. If she gets raped, it is her fault.

“Conservative Afghan lawmakers block legislation protecting women’s rights,” from theAssociated Press, May 18 (thanks to all who sent this in):

KABUL, Afghanistan — Conservative religious lawmakers in Afghanistan blocked legislation on Saturday aimed at strengthening provisions for women’s freedoms, arguing that parts of it violate Islamic principles and encourage disobedience.The fierce opposition highlights how tenuous women’s rights remain a dozen years after the ouster of the hard-line Taliban regime, whose strict interpretation of Islam once kept Afghan women virtual prisoners in their homes.

Khalil Ahmad Shaheedzada, a conservative lawmaker for Herat province, said the legislation was withdrawn shortly after being introduced in parliament because of an uproar by religious parties who said parts of the law are un-Islamic.

“Whatever is against Islamic law, we don’t even need to speak about it,”Shaheedzada said.

The Law on Elimination of Violence Against Women has been in effect since 2009, but only by presidential decree. It is being brought before parliament now because lawmaker Fawzia Kofi, a women’s rights activist, wants to cement it with a parliamentary vote to prevent its potential reversal by any future president who might be tempted to repeal it to satisfy hard-line religious parties.

The law criminalizes, among other things, child marriage and forced marriage, and bans “baad,” the traditional practice of selling and buying women to settle disputes. It also makes domestic violence a crime punishable by up to three years in prison and specifies that rape victims should not face criminal charges for fornication or adultery.

Kofi, who plans to run for president in next year’s elections, said she was disappointed because among those who oppose upgrading the law from presidential decree to legislation passed by parliament are women.

Afghanistan’s parliament has more than 60 female lawmakers, mostly due to constitutional provisions reserving certain seats for women.

There has been spotty enforcement of the law as it stands. A United Nations analysis in late 2011 found only a small percentage of reported crimes against women were pursued by the Afghan government. Between March 2010 and March 2011 — the first full Afghan year the decree was in effect — prosecutors filed criminal charges in only 155 cases, or 7 percent of the total number of crimes reported.

The child marriage ban and the idea of protecting female rape victims from prosecution were particularly heated subjects in Saturday’s parliamentary debate, said Nasirullah Sadiqizada Neli, a conservative lawmaker from Daykundi province.

Neli suggested that removing the custom — common in Afghanistan — of prosecuting raped women for adultery would lead to social chaos, with women freely engaging in extramarital sex safe in the knowledge they could claim rape if caught….

4 thoughts on “Afghanistan: Pro-Sharia lawmakers block law criminalizing child marriage and banning prosecution of rape victims for adultery”

  1. Oh, the angst this must cause in the dhim/libtard mind!

    But, never fear, they have the answer … “It’s their culture, not Islam, so we must respect it”

  2. The AP imbeciles have used ‘conservative’ and ‘liberal’ as synonyms for ‘radical’ and ‘moderate’ moslems, none of which can ever be applied to islam in any way at all, ever. Their continuous stream of coyly, carefully-crafted imprecisions will result in the destruction of our world.

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