Philippines: With Peace Treaties Against Jihad

Mindanao: at least 20 killed in clashes between the army and Islamic rebels

But…but: wasn’t there some kind of a peace process, some historical give and take  jiziya that was meant to pacify the soldiers of allah? And hostage taking is totally un-Islamic, I know because that’s what Muslim instructors teach at the U.S. Army College. So why are these Muslims misunderstanding their religion?

” Only when Muslim power is weak is “temporary truce” (hudna) allowed.”— Islam scholar Bassam Tibi  (Once again we see that treaties with infidels are not worth the paper they’re written on.)

Update:

Mindanao, at least 20 killed in clashes between the army and Islamic rebels

The worst affected province is Sulu, on the border with Malaysia. The clashes are the most serious since the signing of the Framework Agreement between the Philippine government and rebels of the Moro Islamic Liberation in November 2012. Extremist groups belonging to al-Qaeda linked Abu Sayyaf foment violence. Fear of attacks against civilian targets in the capital of Jolo.

Update:

This report came in earlier:

Seven Philippine Marines, Seven Militants Killed in Anti-Terror Offensive to Rescue Hostages

Seven Philippine Marines, Seven Militants Killed in Anti-Terror Offensive to Rescue Hostages

“They might stage bombings and kidnappings…”  –Read More »

Sulu (AsiaNews / Agencies) Clashes continue between the Philippine army and Islamic rebels of Abu Sayyaf in Mindanao (southern Philippines). In two days, 20 soldiers and seven militants were killed during operations to oust the militants from the province of Sulu, the most western part of the archipelago. Meanwhile, the army has launched a vast operation to free Jenifer Casilda Villarasa, wife of Sergeant Faustino Villarasa, kidnapped May 8 last by a group of Islamic extremists. The death toll is one of the most serious since the signing of the Framework Agreement between the Philippine government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) for peace in Mindanao.

Philippine Army spokesman, Gen. Dimingo Tutaan, said the military offensive was to secure the villages of the province and to ensure that civilians do not end up in the crossfire between regular troops and rebels.

Police in Sulu have deployed all of their forces to prevent attacks against vulnerable civilian targets. The province is part of the new Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao, the result of the framework agreements signed between MILF and the government in November. Despite the joint efforts between former rebels and government forces, the area is still prey to extremist groups who receive arms and training in Indonesia and Malaysia. Among them are Abu Sayyaf, a terrorist group close to al-Qaeda was born in the 1990s and the Bansamoro Islamic Freedom Fighetrs (Biff), established in 2011 by former members of the MILF who still pursue the full independence of the region.

In recent years the city of Jolo, the capital of the province of Sulu in the southern Philippines, has been the scene of attacks and violence. The area is home to a large Christian minority, about 40% of the population, who live alongside the majority Muslims.  The Christian community is often the target of attacks by extremists. On 7 July 2009 the cathedral of Mount Carmel was attacked: a grenade was thrown at the building causing the death of six people with about forty others wounded.

 Explanations:

Dr. Fattal describes the Muslim view of what justifies Muslims in sometimes making treaties with Infidels:

“Connected with the notion of jihad is the distinction between dar al-harb (territory or “house” of war) and dar al-islam (house of Islam). The latter includes all territories subject to Moslem authority. It is in a state of perpetual war with the dar al-harb. The inhabitants of the dar al-harb are harbis, who are not answerable to the Islamic authority and whose persons and goods are mubah, that is, at the mercy of Believers. However, when Muslims are in a subordinate state, they can negotiate a truce with the Harbis lasting no more than ten years, which they are obliged to revoke unilaterally as soon as they regain the upper hand, following the example of the Prophet after Hudaibiyya.”

And here is the scholar of Islam Bassam Tibi, originally from Syria, writing in 1996. (After years teaching in Germany, Professor Tibi now teaches at Cornell):

“Islamic wars are not hurub (the plural of harb) but rather futuhat, acts of “opening” the world to Islam and expressing Islamic jihad. Relations between dar al-Islam, the home of peace, and dar al-harb, the world of unbelievers, nevertheless take place in a state of war, according to the Qur’an and to the authoritative commentaries of Islamic jurists. Unbelievers who stand in the way, creating obstacles for the da’wa, are blamed for this state of war, for the da’wa can be pursued peacefully if others submit to it. In other words, those who resist Islam cause wars and are responsible for them. Only when Muslim power is weak is “temporary truce” (hudna) allowed.”