What the enemedia is not telling you about Syria

So far the best and most realistic assessment of the situation I have seen:

In other news:

Russia Warns Chemical Weapons May Come From Rebels, Not Assad

 “Heavily edited?”- Not!

“The (Oz) Labor Party is the party of the Muslim Brotherhood.”

Syrian official: Israel ‘will come under fire’ if Syria attacked

Ynet News

Iraq Inner Struggle

Jihadis murder 41 at coffee shop, wedding party, and fake security checkpoint

Remember: in our Orwellian age, the problem is not the ideology behind these murders. The problem is those who look into the ideology behind these murders. “Bloody Sunday: Insurgent attacks in Iraq kill at least 41,” by Sinan Salaheddin for The Associated Press, August 25 (thanks to JW):

BAGHDAD — Insurgents bent on destabilizing Iraq killed at least 41 people in numerous attacks scattered around the country on Sunday, striking targets as varied as a coffee shop, a wedding party convoy and a carload of off-duty soldiers.

Egypt:

Muslim clerics pushing people to support Muslim Brotherhood during Friday prayers

“Muslim Brotherhood’s bid to scapegoat Christians failing, say Egyptians,” by Lisa Daftari for FoxNews.com, August 25:JW

Robert Spencer on Sun TV on rallies against the Muslim Brotherhood

Last Thursday night, his regular weekly appearance on Michael Coren’s The Arena on Sun TV — with Ryan Doyle filling in this week for Michael.

UK: Muslim soldiers to visit schools to try to counter Islamophobia

No shiite:

Ministers are to send serving Muslim soldiers into schools around the country to counter Islamaphobia in the wake of the killing of Lee Rigby, The Independent has learnt. …

More on the latest desperate and futile attempt to alloy iron and clay at The Independent/Oliver Wright/Mullah

More:

3 thoughts on “What the enemedia is not telling you about Syria”

  1. As the West considers action against the ruling Assad regime in Syria, we must take note of a chilling warning from 1914

    As the centenary of the 1914-1918 Great War approaches, historian Christopher Clark points out that conflict’s eerie, modern relevance.
    ‘The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand began with a cavalcade of automobiles and a squad of suicide bombers: the young men who gathered in Sarajevo with bombs on 28 June 1914 had been told by their handlers to take their own lives after carrying out their mission, and received phials of potassium cyanide to do it with,’ he says in a London Review of Books essay.
    ‘Behind the outrage at Sarajevo was an avowedly terrorist organisation with a cult of sacrifice, death and revenge: extra- territorial, secretive, scattered in cells across political borders, its links to any sovereign government were oblique.’
    Sound familiar?
    Al Qaeda stokes the ire of Muslims angry at what they see as the defilement of their lands by the oil-seeking, infidel West.
    Our retaliation for its September 2001 attack on America with hijacked passenger jets, killing more than 3,000, was to invade Afghanistan and Saddam Hussein’s Iraq, costing more than 100,000 Islamic lives on top of our own sad audit of dead and maimed.
    But 9/11, as Americans call it, did not trigger the Third World War. On the contrary, for a brief moment — before the retaliation began — Americans enjoyed the sympathy of most of the world.
    Now, it’s different. America, urged by its European allies, considers action against the ruling Assad regime in Syria, which stands accused of using poison gas to kill hundreds of its people.

    The West is drawing up a list of targets for Cruise missile strikes aimed at crippling the Assad regime.
    How will Syria’s main allies, Russia and Iran, respond? Putin’s spokesmen deplore the poison gas attack, but suggest it might have been the work of the Syrian rebels, which include Al Qaeda elements. They point out that Assad’s military is winning and doesn’t need to resort to using illegal weapons, and suggest that only the rebels stood to gain from the international anger aroused by such an attack.

    But our own Foreign Secretary, William Hague, says Assad was responsible and must be removed.
    Hague’s bad cop hawkishness allows his patron, good cop President Obama, to remain measured.
    President Obama ‘looks at all the options’. We’re told he spent 40 minutes discussing them with David Cameron (a fact made public to flatter the latter?).
    But he earlier told CNN that Americans expected him to think about ‘our long-term national interests’, adding: ‘Sometimes what we’ve seen is that folks will call for immediate action, jumping into stuff that does not turn out well, gets us mired in difficult situations, can result in us being drawn into very expensive, difficult, costly interventions that breed more resentment.’
    Would Obama’s cautious approach survive another poison gas attack in Syria, or something even worse?

    Foreign Secretary, William Hague, says Assad was responsible and must be removed. Hague’s bad cop hawkishness allows his patron, good cop President Obama, to remain measured
    The Sarajevo-style plotters of today — Al Qaeda and associated jihadists — dream of forcing rival blocs to take sides in a great war, in the hope it will somehow usher in a new, world-wide Islamic imperium.
    The statesmen of 1914 were adept at presenting war as the only possible solution, while pushing responsibility from their own shoulders, says historian Christopher Clark, adding: ‘Their present-day colleagues have not lost this skill.’
    The funny-looking men in jerky old newsreel film might seem to belong to another world but, as the Nobel prize-winning novelist William Faulkner remarks, in Requiem For A Nun: ‘The past is never dead. It’s not even past.’

    America, urged by its European allies, is considering action against the ruling Assad regime in Syria, which stands accused of using poison gas to kill hundreds of its people

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-2401883/As-West-considers-action-ruling-Assad-regime-Syria-heed-warning-1914.html#ixzz2d5nu6MRo
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  2. “They point out that Assad’s military is winning and doesn’t need to resort to using illegal weapons, and suggest that only the rebels stood to gain from the international anger aroused by such an attack.”

    Exactly, why the insurgents need the West. To do what they can’t, beat Assad’s military.

    A deliberate manipulative tactic to get the West to do their dirty work.

    The more serious question is, where did the missiles come from?

    Brilliant use of Faulkner. ‘The past is never dead. It’s not even past.’ Ain’t that the truth! Even in Europe and America grudges are still held against neighboring countries and states, that go back hundreds of years. Nothing is ever really forgotten or forgiven.

  3. Gavrilo Princip, the killer of the Archduke, was … an Ottoman MUSLIM.

    The six conspirators lined the route. They were spaced out along the Appel Quay, each one with instructions to try to kill Franz Ferdinand when the royal car reached his position.

    The first conspirator on the route to see the royal car was Muhamed Mehmedbašić.

    Standing by the Austro-Hungarian Bank, Mehmedbašić lost his nerve and allowed the car to pass without taking action. Mehmedbašić later said that a policeman was standing behind him and feared he would be arrested before he had a chance to throw his bomb.[8]

    At 10:15, when the six-car procession passed the central police station, nineteen-year-old student Nedeljko ÄŒabrinović hurled a hand grenade at the Archduke’s car. The driver accelerated when he saw the object flying towards him, but the bomb had a 10 second delay and exploded under the wheel of the fourth car. Two of the occupants, Eric von Merizzi and Count Alexander von Boos-Waldeck were seriously wounded. About a dozen spectators were also hit by bomb shrapnel.[9]

    After ÄŒabrinović’s bomb missed the Archduke’s car, four other conspirators, including Princip, lost an opportunity to attack because of the heavy crowds and the high speed of the Archduke’s car. To avoid capture, ÄŒabrinović swallowed a cyanide capsule and jumped into the River Miljacka to make sure he died. The cyanide pill was expired and made him sick, but failed to kill him and the River Miljacka was only 10 centimetres (4 in) deep. A few seconds later he was hauled out and detained by police.

    Franz Ferdinand later decided to go to the hospital and visit the victims of ÄŒabrinović’s failed bombing attempt. In order to avoid the city centre, General Oskar Potiorek decided that the royal car should travel straight along the Appel Quay to the Sarajevo Hospital.

    However, Potiorek forgot to inform the driver, Leopold Loyka, about this decision. On the way to the hospital, Loyka took a right turn into Franz Josef Street.

    Princip was standing near Moritz Schiller’s cafe, when he spotted Franz Ferdinand’s car as it drove past, having taken the wrong turn. After realizing the mistake, the driver put his foot on the brake, and began to reverse the car. In doing so the engine of the car stalled and the gears locked, giving Princip his opportunity.

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