Flashback: Kenya mall jihad mass murderers take breaks from killing to pray

Video: Kenya mall jihad mass murderers take breaks from killing to pray

But hey: nothing to do with Islam. You don’t believe me? Don’t take my word for it, ask Sheila! 

Islamic supremacist spokesmen constantly insist that any connection between Islam and terrorism is incidental — there are terrorists who happen to be Muslim, but not killers who are moved to kill by Islamic texts and teachings. This is contradicted by the statements of virtually every Islamic jihadist who has ever issued a statement, and here the contradiction is graphically illustrated.

“Kenya shopping mall attack: Chilling new footage from inside Westgate shows terrorists casually gunning down innocent shoppers,” by John Hall for theIndependent, October 17 (thanks to Benedict):

Warning: Video contains images that some may find disturbing.Chilling new CCTV footage has emerged of terrorists casually gunning down shoppers during the attack on Kenya’s Westgate shopping centre last month.

In a video obtained by CNN, one man can be seen hiding behind a supermarket kiosk as the gunmen storm the mall.

As shoppers run for their lives, a terrorist casually approaches the cowering man and fires a bullet into his body from close-range.

In the next clip the man is seen writhing in agony, before a third scene captures him lying in a pool of his own blood as the gunman returns and fires more shots at him. It is believed the man died as a result of his injuries.

Elsewhere in the CCTV footage, a British family – including a four-year-old boy who famously told one of the terrorists he was “a very bad man” – can be seen being told to leave the supermarket by one of the gunmen.

A mother and her children are allowed to leave A mother and her children are allowed to leave

As the mother – who had already been shot in the thigh by a terrorist – leads her children from the store using a shopping trolley to carry one of her injured offspring, she is seen being followed by a terrified, blood-soaked teenage girl, and finally by one of the gunmen.

The footage also shows terrorists calmly chatting on their mobile phones while scouting the mall for new victims. The al-Qa’ida linked, Somalia-based terror group al-Shabaab insists it kept in contact with the men throughout the attack.

During rare quiet periods during the subsequent four-day siege, the Western-dressed Islamist terrorists are seen taking turns to kneel down and pray as their assault-rifle wielding colleagues stand guard.

Raymond Ibrahim: Jihad or Terrorism?

The Semantic Arguments of Islam’s Authorities

A recent Arabic article appearing in Egypt’s Al Ahram newspaper titled “Is Terrorism Jihad?” written by Islamic law expert Dr. Abdul Fatah Idris offers important lessons—from the fact that jihad does involve subjugating non-Muslims to why the Western mentality is still incapable of acknowledging it.

Idris, professor and chairman of Al Azhar University’s Department of Comparative Jurisprudence at the Faculty of Sharia Law, is a well-reputed legal scholar. He begins his article by quoting from various international bodies that correctly define terrorism as violence or threats of violence as a means of coercion.

Idris also mentions how “the Islamic Research Academy, in its report issued on November 4th, 2001, defines terrorism as terrorizing innocent people and the destruction of their properties and their essential elements of living and attacking their finances and their persons and their liberties and their human dignity without right and spreading corruption throughout the land.”

It is interesting to note that, although he quotes from several international bodies, it is only the “Islamic Research Academy” that includes words like “innocent” and “without right,” both of which clearly leave much wiggle room to exonerate terrorist acts committed against those perceived as not being “innocent” or who it is a right to terrorize, which according to many Muslims, includes the West.

At any rate, in the context of the Muslim Brotherhood’s recent terrorist attacks throughout Egypt—including the destruction of over 80 Christian churches—Idris agrees that,

It is therefore correct to define what happened recently [in Egypt] as terrorism and it cannot be called, as some have done [e.g., Muslim Brotherhood, Sheikh Yusuf Qaradawi, et al.], a jihad or ribat in the path of Allah, for the difference between them is vast. Terrorism is a crime, both according to Sharia and the law; and all international conventions consider it a crime and call on all people to fight against it through all means.

Up until this point, Idris defines and agrees with the international definition of terrorism, and portrays the actions of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt (whom he never names) as terrorism.So far so good.

However, Idris immediately makes a complete reversal in his follow-up sentences:

But jihad in the path of Allah, to make his word supreme, spread his religion, defend the honor of the Islamic nation [umma], and respond to the aggression against Muslims all around the earth—this is jihad: when a Muslim fights an infidel without treaty to make the word of Allah Most High supreme, forcing him to fight or invading his land, this is a permissible matter according to the consensus of the jurists. Indeed, it is an obligation for all Muslims. Now if the deeds of the jihad—including fighting the infidels and breaking their spine through all possible means—are permissible according to Sharia, then it is impossible to define those acts as terrorism, which Sharia-based evidence has made illegitimate. A large gap exists between them [jihad and terrorism]. And there is no connection between what is obligatory [jihad] and what is forbidden [terrorism].

At this point, the befuddled Western reader may be at a loss to understand how, exactly, jihad—“according to the consensus of the jurists,” no less—is different from the aforementioned definitions of terrorism.What’s needed here is for the non-Muslim to try to transcend his epistemology and think, for a moment, like an observant Muslim, especially in the context of two points:… Continue reading

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