It begins: Muslim agitprops and their enablers get Australia to drop ‘racial labels’

Creeping political correctness:

Australians will no longer be able to know what kind of people are involved in crime and what kind of crime they are involved in. When you go to the NSW Police Website they have an Asian Crime Squad and a Middle Eastern Organized Crime Squad. Quite obviously there is more crime, particularly gun crime in Middle Eastern Immigrant communities. Otherwise the Police would not have dedicated squads  to cope with it.

Egyptian born Deputy Police Commissioner Nick Kaldas, who supports this initiative, carefully omits every reference to his religion, which is rather unusual for people from the ME, where religion dominates everything.

Joseph Wakim tells us  “the racialisation of crimes is a cultural cop-out”

You can google him here:

The alarm clock was programmed for the 6.30am news bulletin. The first three stories centred on names that I recognised as Middle Eastern: Obeid, Gittany, Hamzy. The blanket of shame was poised to cover my head when the news reader mentioned their ethnicity. But he never did. This was a new alarm clock but we seem to have snoozed right through a milestone moment.

Eddie Obeid was at the centre of the ICAC inquiries. Simon Gittany was accused of throwing his fiancee from a 15th-floor balcony. Mohammed Hamzy was recently arrested as the de facto gang leader of Brothers 4 Life.

A decade ago, such names would have been magnets for the ”other” label, treated as non-Australians, baiting the shock jocks to call for immediate deportation. Police, media and government statements would have been littered with references to ”Middle Eastern” as if this explained everything, even though it explained nothing.

But this racialisation of the crimes was a cultural cop-out, as if the Middle Eastern DNA predisposed “these people” to crime, even though they were home-grown.

Fast forward 10 years, and NSW Premier Barry O’Farrell congratulates the police for their efforts “to tackle gun crime across this city”. No reference to race. Simple as that. After ”breaking the back” of the gang on November 7, Deputy Police Commissioner Nick Kaldas also made no reference to race: “We arrested 10 members of the Brothers 4 Life gang, all of whom were hit with very serious charges.”

As well as commending Operation Talon, which has halved gun crimes since its start on August 17, Kaldas also noted the “members of the community who have already come forward … in helping us seize guns and arrest the criminals.”

Rather than resorting to racial labels and alienating the community, the new police culture builds on relationships and co-operation to deliver results.

The police statements to the media never once used crude descriptors such as ”Middle Eastern appearance” and demonstrated that this is irrelevant and unnecessary. Contrary to all the scaremongering about removing these distracting descriptors, the recent arrests suggest that they may hinder rather than help in effective policing, as they risk putting offside those the police most need to be onside. Removal of racial references ensures lines of inquiry are not railroaded by ethnic detours.

By removing the race-tinted glasses and race labels from their apparatus, police may have inadvertently cracked the code of silence that often frustrates their efforts. By deeming race as irrelevant, the police leadership has steered public discourse towards a criminal gun culture, not a criminal ethnic culture, and talkback radio has finally followed suit. The strategy has succeeded in smoking out the criminals rather than driving them underground.

In my outreach work in building trust within the street sub-culture, it was clear that if there was no relationship, there was no responsibility. The rapport that the police have built with communities has replaced cold-calling with hot leads.

Kaldas aptly articulates this partnership: “Please remember, the information you provide could save the life of someone you love.”

When police behave badly, there are passionate demands for a public inquiry as to what went wrong. But when police swiftly snuff out a crime wave, there needs to be equally passionate demands for an inquiry as to what went right.

The lessons learned could be shared and applied not only in other Australian jurisdictions tackling gang and bikie crimes, but internationally.

If the police culture focuses on the criminal culture, not the ethnic culture, then it is a win-win-win for all concerned.

Joseph Wakim is founder of the Australian Arabic Council and a former multicultural affairs commissioner.
Read more: http://www.watoday.com.au/comment/policespeak-drops-racial-labels-community-the-winner-20131117-2xp28.html#ixzz2l6dGbnkS

4 thoughts on “It begins: Muslim agitprops and their enablers get Australia to drop ‘racial labels’”

  1. # In my outreach work in building trust within the street sub-culture, it was clear that if there was no relationship, there was no responsibility.

    Where, and with whom? Or is his “outreach work” not targeted at specific groups?

    (I very much doubt it)

  2. I remember old Joe coming into our school dressed as a hippie back in the 1980s telling us how easy we had it compared to the immigrants (even though a big chunk of the school were wogs) and the street kids etc. I woke up long enough to note that some of the girls were debating his speaking points. He was a useless socialist hack back then and nothing has changed. He seems to have made a career of being a useless socialist hack.

  3. I remember old Joe coming into our school dressed as a hippie back in the 1980s telling us how easy we had it compared to the immigrants (even though a big chunk of the school were wogs) and the street kids etc who in most cases I knew were idiots. I woke up long enough to note that some of the girls were debating his speaking points. He was a useless socialist hack back then and nothing has changed. He seems to have made a career of being a useless socialist hack.

  4. “…If the police culture focuses on the criminal culture, not the ethnic culture, then it is a win-win-win for all concerned….”

    If the ethnic culture focusses on its own criminal culture – then there is a win-win. In the past and at the moment and into the foreseeable future the police are met with a wall of silence and non-cooperation.

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