Everything is our fault

The usual delirious claptrap from the watermelon worshipers.

Anna Burke, Christine Milne share jihadist view that terror is our fault

They think of themselves as moral supremacists. Instead, they are just bedwetters stooped in ignorance and stupidity.

Among the jihadists slaughtering Shi’ites, Christians, Yazidis and homosexuals in Iraq and Syria are about 100 Australians.

Up to 30 Australians fighting for Islamic State’s caliphate-of-sorts have been killed, including at least three in suicide bombings.

More than 100 Australian passports have been cancelled to prevent still more jihadists leaving our shores to join this extremist army, while 13 requests for passports have been declined and nine have been cancelled.

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Our security agencies believe 150 people (including up to 40 women) are providing funding and facilitation from Australia for individuals and groups linked to Islamic State.

In the previous two decades, 30 Australians travelled to Afghanistan and Pakistan to train or fight with Islamist groups; of the 25 who returned, 19 were involved in ­activities of “security concern” and eight were convicted of terror offences.

During the past decade, before the latest raids and incidents, more than a dozen Australians were convicted of terrorist plots, including plans to bomb the AFL grand final and attack the Hols­worthy army base in Sydney. Some are serving prison sentences of more than 20 years.

ASIO is running more than 400 high-priority counter-terrorism investigations and, since the national terror threat level was raised to high for the first time in September, seven counter-terrorism raids involving hundreds of police have arrested 23 people.

Two terrorists (one in Sydney’s Martin Place and one in Melbourne’s Endeavour Hills) have carried out attacks inspired by ­Islamic State — leading to the extremists being shot dead, two innocent civilians being killed and numerous injuries including stab wounds to two police officers.

Last Saturday, police raided homes in suburban Melbourne, leading to three arrests and ­charges over an alleged plot to kill police and civilians at Anzac Day ceremonies.

Two days later on the ABC television’s Q&A program, comedian Dave Hughes said, “Well, you’d hope the raids don’t make things worse.”

On the same program, Labor MP Anna Burke chose not to condemn jihadists but instead spoke about “Catholics who were part of the IRA” and “vegan extremists”, before saying that she had spoken to a “beautiful Muslim girl” who now feared “going in the street with a headscarf”.

“I mean, we used to pride ourselves on being multicultural, diverse, tolerant,” lamented Burke.

“Surely we should be an accepting society, and if we’re not going to have acceptance then we are going to create extremism, aren’t we?”

In The Age on Wednesday, former ABC presenter Jonathan Holmes railed against the government’s anti-terror, metadata laws.

“For days, we’ve been scaring ourselves silly because a few Melbourne teenagers might have planned to attack police officers with knives on Anzac Day,” wrote Holmes.

“Good on the cops for nabbing them, but hardly an existential threat to our society.”

Jihadist denialism does not seem to be abating, no matter how the Islamist violence touches us.

Incomprehensibly, the latest surge of denial and self-loathing emerged in December last year even while 17 innocent hostages were being held at gunpoint in the Lindt cafe at Martin Place.

Twitter didn’t have the wit to express solidarity and hope for the innocents threatened with death; instead it provided a hashtag opportunity (#Illridewithyou) for people to tweet their solidarity with Muslims who might (or, as it happens, might not) have faced a backlash on public transport.

As we now know, two of the hostages were killed and never again had the chance to ride on any transport, or express any views, with any people of any faith.

Back on Q&A, Burke could not even bring herself to pin down the problem to the small minority of extremist radicals who preach hate.

“No, I think the problem lies in us reaching out to individuals who feel disconnected,” said the former Speaker of the House of Representatives, “and are they going to this mosque because they feel disconnected from our ­society?”

Suddenly we see the common ground: the jihadists and people such as Burke are in agreement — it is our fault, we have invited terror upon ourselves.

So on national television we had a federal parliamentarian accepting communal culpability for the intimidation allegedly felt by a Muslim girl — apparently because of fears triggered by jihadists — while embracing communal blame for the radicalisation of those same terrorists.

No wonder Burke has it in for the Catholics — she’d never get out of confession.

Fellow Labor MP Melissa Parke has accused the Abbott government of talking up terrorism to distract from budget woes, and Greens leader Christine Milne says the Prime Minister has been “fanning the flames of fear”.

“Tony Abbott is again pressing the terror button in order to shore up his own position. It won’t make us safer,” Milne said in February.

The Greens have demanded our navy be sent to Antarctica to protect whales but oppose Australia’s Iraq deployment to stop ­Islamic State’s slaughter of men, women and children.

The bad news for the denialists is that despite our geographic isolation, multicultural tolerance, benign global ambitions and our hopes and best intentions, we confront a very evil menace — global Islamist extremism. Julia Gillard said the 9/11 decade was behind us, but the era stretches ahead possibly for decades.

If we doubt the patience and persistence of this bloodthirsty ideology we should remember that it was not entirely unfamiliar to the original Anzacs.

On New Year’s Day 1915, four Australians were shot dead in a random attack on a picnic train near Broken Hill in NSW by two men who hailed from what is now Pakistan.

With the Ottoman and British empires at war, Mullah Abdulla and Badsha Mohammed Gool believed it was their duty to fight for their God.

“I must kill you and give my life for my faith, Allahu Akbar,” said one of the notes that they left behind.

Sadly, the same pernicious threat manifests itself in the contorted world view of the modern ­jihadists, whether we choose to recognise it — or not.

2 thoughts on “Everything is our fault”

  1. Incorrect Statements – because islam and islams WILL NEVER be Australians ….
    Among the jihadists slaughtering Shi’ites, Christians, Yazidis and homosexuals in Iraq and Syria are about 100 Australians.
    &
    Up to 30 Australians fighting for Islamic State’s caliphate-of-sorts have been killed, including at least three in suicide bombings.

    Very Bad Policy – Better to get islam out of Australia ….
    More than 100 Australian passports have been cancelled to prevent still more jihadists leaving our shores to join this extremist army, while 13 requests for passports have been declined and nine have been cancelled.

    The above are a few examples of islam Appeasement !
    The only explanation !
    Good Bye islam Appeasers !!!
    Then – Goodbye islams AND islam

    So – in Reality …. this articles heading
    Everything -IS- our fault
    is correct
    We have allowed and continue to allow “our” islam Appeasing “authorities” to do it – import islam !!!!

    So lets see if the situation is understood ….
    to remove islam from Australia
    Australians have to incarcerate (or even “remove”) the islam Appeasing “Authorities” FIRST !!!

    Consider it doing doing – DONE !!!
    AND – Get islam /indonesia out of West Papua

    1. Indonesia out of West Papua? Are you kidding?
      Now, does that also mean we should kick those papuans out of other parts of Indonesia? I see big groups of them every day every where in my town.
      They are humans, we can’t kick them out. Let them enjoy the good education and good food here, unless you give them custody in Australia of course.
      I love Australia, I have been there, I know you are not seriously willing to cater papuans to flood into your country😃, but if you are, feel free to do so.

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