Since when is it our job to provide for Muselmaniacs?

Islamic leaders have challenged the federal government and the private sector to address high unemployment rates in their communities by creating work opportunities for Muslims and boosting their sense of social self-worth.

Prominent Muslim figure Keysar Trad responded to controversial comments made by the federal Social Services Minister, Scott Morrison, in The Weekend Australian, in which he said the 50,000 asylum-seekers who came by boat to Australia under Labor presented particular problems, even ­dangers.

Because of a range of economic and social factors, Mr Morrison said, many Muslim migrants were not equipped with skills necessary to participate in mainstream Australian life and were vulnerable to the predations of criminals and ­extremists.

“At best these consequences are long-term unemployment and welfare dependence and at worst gangs, violent crime and even terrorism, ” he told The Weekend Australian.

Continue Reading

‘First things first: give us work’

Mohamed El-leissy, the former Imam Council of Victoria’s youth engagement officer, has identified unemployment as critical to social cohesion. Picture: David Geraghty Source: News Corp Australia

THEAUSTRALIAN.COM.AU

It is not the governments (taxpayers) job to provide for unassimilable Mohammedans. How did they ever survive without us?

Islamic leaders have challenged the federal government and the private sector to address high unemployment rates in their communities by creating work opportunities for Muslims and boosting their sense of social self-worth.

Prominent Muslim figure Keysar Trad responded to controversial comments made by the federal Social Services Minister, Scott Morrison, in The Weekend Australian, in which he said the 50,000 asylum-seekers who came by boat to Australia under Labor presented particular problems, even ­dangers.

Because of a range of economic and social factors, Mr Morrison said, many Muslim migrants were not equipped with skills necessary to participate in mainstream Australian life and were vulnerable to the predations of criminals and ­extremists.

“At best these consequences are long-term unemployment and welfare dependence and at worst gangs, violent crime and even terrorism, ” he told The Weekend Australian.

Mr Trad, the founder of the Islami­c Friendship Association, said: “I agree that there are economic factors, but the main one is unemployment.”

He has raised the issue in “several sermons” to his Sydney community.

“I have pleaded with those in the community, if they have any means of employing someone, even if they have space for work experience, to do it,” he said.

The 2011 census revealed the unemployment rate among Muslims was 12 per cent, about double the national average at the time.

Mr Trad challenged the government to invest resources in creating job opportunities for Muslim youth.

“I think the best way to start job creation is within the public service itself,” he said.

“It is a great training ground, and what better way to serve Australian society?”

Mr Morrison said “religion isn’t the issue” in the growing dissonance within Islamic communities.

However, Mr Trad said “ignorance of religion is a factor”.

The Islamic State terrorist group deployed “the glory of historical identity” to prey on jobless and malleable Muslims who did not have a strong sense of their own religion, Mr Trad said.

“These young people haven’t had access to the same proper religious education that others have,” he said. “It appeals to their feelings of persecution and says, ‘I’m going to save you from being a victim in Australia’.”

Victorian Muslim youth community leader Mohammed El-leiss­y said those in the Islamic community were being “excluded from employment opportunities” with detrimental effects, and called on private-sector employers to take on Muslims who, he said, “came from cultures where hard work was expected”.

Mr El-leissy, the former Imam Council of Victoria’s youth engagement officer, also identified unemployment as critical to social cohesion.

“It plays a big part in what a lot of Muslims feel and what drives them to turn away to other avenues, whether it is criminal ways of making money or terrorism,” he said.

“It isn’t simply a case of will: there are some very real-world barriers for people finding employ­ment.

“If your name is Mohammed and you go and apply for a job, you are less likely to get a call back.

“Corporate Australia needs to get on board.’’

Human resources managers who gave Muslim applicants a fair go would reap the benefits within their organisation, Mr El-leissy said.

“Any form of diversity always nourishes corporate culture and (Muslims’) ability to engage in a multinational capacity opens up new markets,” he said.

8 thoughts on “Since when is it our job to provide for Muselmaniacs?”

  1. So they want Australia , which already has a high number of unemployed to give them special treatment so they can have jobs so that they can have their six to ten children per couple (as mandated by the expectation to contribute to the outbreeding of their host societies), then get extra Family Benefits for each of their children?

    Yeah, right.

    Muslims do contribute to the economy in some way – many of them are providing work for the Middle Eastern Crime Squad.

  2. Don’t give preferential treatment to mooseslums, plenty of the other 98% of Australia looking for work already.

    And do not put mooseslums in public government roles, else they’ll just exploit the system even further.

    Best answer, get them out of my country, they are not wanted and we don’t want to hand over our jobs and taxes to the freeloading headbag wearers.

    Do not listen to the fruitcakes, just get them out of Oz!

  3. Right! We owe it to them to tolerantly educate them about their holy crimes, and to give them jobs, because, as they are swarthy mentally inferior people, it’s our white man’s burden responsibility to look after them.

Comments are closed.