Turkey: Military Coup against Erdogan Fails

Too bad the coup against Erdogan didn’t succeed.
At the time of this writing, the situation was still in flux in Turkey, but Erdogan’s is now firmly back in charge in Istanbul, where he is reportedly addressing a huge crowd. Even if his regime survives this coup attempt, free people may hope that the supporters of secularism in Turkey will not be entirely silenced, shunted aside and persecuted by the pro-Sharia Islamic supremacist Erdogan. And this evening it has been interesting to watch all the spokesmen for Muslim Brotherhood-linked groups in the U.S. tweeting about their fervent support for “democracy” and hope that Erdogan would survive the coup. They may get their wish, but nonetheless, there will still be people who will not go quietly. (More here)

erdoganobama“Turkish Coup Attempt Caused by Erdogan’s ‘Support of Islamists,’” Russia’s state-run Sputnik, July 16, 2016:

A part of the Turkish military has initiated the coup attempt in the country as it felt the national security had been threaten [sic] by President Erdogan’s support of Islamists, Samir Aita, a member of the Syrian Democratic Forum opposition party told Sputnik.

‘They will pay a heavy price for their treason’: Turkish soldiers surrender on Bosphorus Bridge after overnight military coup FAILS, ending with 250 dead as President Erdogan vows revenge

Europe’s Turkey?
Given the events happening in Mohammedan occupied Anatolia and Thrace tonight one must ask the question “Have the Turkish military left it too late?”

‘They will pay a heavy price for their treason’: Turkish soldiers surrender on Bosphorus Bridge after overnight military coup FAILS, ending with 250 dead as President Erdogan vows revenge

  • WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES 
  • Turkish troops launched an unsuccessful military coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s government
  • At least 1,500 are wounded in the bloody uprising as Erdogan supporters clashed with the military rebels on Friday
  • The Turkish parliamentary building was bombed and both police and citizens were gunned down in the streets
  • President Erdogan has sworn revenge on those responsible as he blamed Fethullah Gulen in Philadelphia, U.S.
  • ‘What is being perpetrated is a rebellion and a treason,’ he said warning there would be a ‘heavy price’ to pay 

More than 2,800 rebels have been detained after their failed military coup that killed at least 250 and wounded more than 1,500 as Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan vowed revenge for the bloody uprising.

Erdogan made his triumphant return back to Istanbul after his forces quelled the coup on Friday evening, as he warned that the members of the military behind the plot to oust him would pay a ‘heavy price for their treason’.

Some 104 plotters were killed after a coup attempt to bring down the Turkish government, while 160 people – at least 41 of them police and 47 civilians – fell as ‘martyrs’.

The Greek police ministry said a Turkish military helicopter landed in Greece this morning and eight men on board, thought to be senior coup plotters, have requested political asylum. Turkey has asked for the men to be extradited back to the country.

President Erdogan meanwhile used Twitter to call on supporters to prevent any additional military action, adding: ‘We should keep on owning the streets no matter at what stage because a new flare-up could take place at any moment.’

The rebel army faction – who call themselves the ‘Peace Council’ – said they were trying to overthrow the government to ‘protect human rights’ and restore democracy from Erdogan’s Justice and Development Party, AKP, which has repeatedly faced criticism from human rights groups and Western allies over its brutal crackdowns on anti-government protesters.

However, Erdogan has blamed his old scapegoat, Fethullah Gulen for orchestrating the uprising. Muslim cleric Gulen, the president’s rival who lives in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania, U.S. as the head of a billion dollar religious movement, has often been blamed for political unrest in Turkey.

The five hours of chaos began when two busloads of soldiers burst into the headquarters of the state-run TRT news agency, taking news off the air and replacing it with a stream of weather forecasts.

After launching the coup, the Turkish military imposed a curfew on civilians telling them to stay in their homes, but Erdogan called on supporters to ignore the order and take to the streets, which is thought to have caused the army to relinquish control.

More than 2,800 rebels have been detained after their failed military coup that killed at least 250 as Turkish President Erdogan vows revenge for the bloody uprising (pictured: Up to 100 rebel soldiers surrendered on Bosphorus Bridge after their failed uprising)

More than 2,800 rebels have been detained after their failed military coup that killed at least 250 as Turkish President Erdogan vows revenge for the bloody uprising (pictured: Up to 100 rebel soldiers surrendered on Bosphorus Bridge after their failed uprising)

Army personnel who had earlier blocked off Istanbul's Bosphorus Bridge raise their hands in surrender as civilians and police take controlArmy personnel who had earlier blocked off Istanbul’s Bosphorus Bridge raise their hands in surrender as civilians and police take control

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks to the media following the end of the military coup which took place overnight

Clothes and weapons beloging to soldiers involved in the coup attempt that have now surrendered lie on the ground abandoned on Bosphorus Bridge

People shout at the soliders involved in the coup attempt who have surrendered on Bosphorus Bridge following their surrender

 The Turkish president warned that the members of the military behind the plot to oust him would pay a ‘heavy price for their treason’ as he blamed his rival Fethullah Gulen for orchestrating the uprising (pictured, soldiers surrender)

 Around 100 Turkish soldiers surrender on Turkey's Bosphorus Bridge after intense fighting with forces loyal to the government

Turkish soldiers, arrested by civilians, are handed to police officers in Taksim Square in Istanbul, Turkey, early Saturday, after the coup

Turkish soldiers, arrested by civilians, are handed to police officers in Taksim Square in Istanbul, Turkey, early Saturday, after the coup

A man lays down in front of a tank on the approach to Ataturk airport in Istanbul as citizens took to the streets to oppose the military coup

The man then stood up and took off his shirt in an effort the present the tank from taking position in the airport 

A Turkish policeman and other people stand atop of a military vehicle in Ankara after crushing the rebellion

People climb on tanks after around a hundred soldiers occupying Bosphorus Bridge surrendered in Istanbul, Turkey on July 16

People carry a man shot during clashes with Turkish military at the entrance to the Bosphorus bridge in Istanbul

After the uprising was crushed in the early hours of Saturday morning, Erdogan told the gathered masses at Ataturk Airport that those loyal to Gulen had ‘penetrated the Armed Forces and the police, among other government agencies, over the past 40 years’.

‘What is being perpetrated is a rebellion and a treason,’ Erdogan said. ‘They will pay a heavy price for their treason to Turkey.’

Up to 100 rebel soldiers surrendered on Bosphorus Bridge after their failed uprising. At least 2,863 connected have been arrested in connection with the dramatic coup which lasted approximately five hours.

New British foreign secretary Boris Johnson said on Twitter that he has spoken to Turkish counterpart Mevlut Cavusoglu following the attempted military coup, adding: ‘I underlined UK support for the democratic elected government and institutions.’

Explosions and gunfire erupted in Istanbul and Ankara on Friday night during the coup which killed at least 250 people in the army’s bid to overthrow the Islamic government.

Elsewhere troops opened fire on civilians attempting to cross the river Bosporus in Istanbul in protest to the military coup, while a bomb exploded at the parliament building according to the state’s press agency as the security situation in the country becomes more perilous.

Colonel Muharrem Kose reportedly led the Turkish military forces in the uprising.

Kose had recently been kicked out of the army, from his position as head of the military’s legal advisory department, over his links to Gulen. He was killed during the clashes with Erdogan’s supporters, sources report.

At least 90died and more than a thousand others were injured during the clashes with Turkish military, pictured is a man shot at the entrance to the Bosphorus bridge in Istanbul

A wounded man is carried away during the attempted coup - one of hundreds injured during the blasts and gunfire battles between rebel soldiers and those loyal to Erdogan

A wounded man is carried away during the attempted coup – one of hundreds injured during the blasts and gunfire battles between rebel soldiers and those loyal to Erdogan

Unarmed civilians carried a man believed to have been shot by Turkish troops away from the Bosphorus bridge in Istanbul 

Unarmed civilians carried a man believed to have been shot by Turkish troops away from the Bosphorus bridge in Istanbul

As many as 17 police officers are believed to have died after military helicopters attacked their headquarters in central Ankara, pictured

Turkey's parliamentary building was bombed during the coup, as this picture shows the devastation from an explosive device

Windows were smashed and doors were blown off their hinges after the bomb on the country's parliamentary building

RECEP TAYYIP ERDOGAN: THE TURKISH  FOOTBALLER-TURNED-POLITICIAN WHO IS SEEKING EU MEMBERSHIP

Erdogan was elected president in 2014 after becoming prime minister in 2003 and served as the Mayor of Instanbul from 1994 to 1998.

He founded the Justice and Development Party, known as the AKP in 2001 and led it through three general elections. He then stepped down as leader in 2003 when he was elected President.

He comes from an Islamist political background and is described as a conservative democrat and has proved to be a divisive character in Turkish society.

Erdogan has become increasingly unpopular with more educated and modernised people but he has denied wanting to impose Islamic values in the country.

He has said he is committed to secularism but supports people’s rights to express their religious beliefs openly.

The party which he founded, AKP, suffered a dip in the polls last summer, but regained popularity again after Turkey’s worst suicide bombing in history last November.

He remains well-liked among the more traditional Muslim community in Turkey, who supported his bids to criminalize adultery and introduce alcohol-free zones in the country although they ultimately failed.

Mr Erdogan owes much of his political success to the stable economy over the last decade.

The unrest in Turkey, which straddles Europe and the Middle East, is of concern to the West as it is on the frontier of the global battle with ISIS and has been used as a base to launch strikes against the terrorist group in Syria.

While the coup was successfully defeated, instability in the area could hamper efforts to tackle the extremist group which has been behind some of the worst terrorist attacks in recent history.

The coup will also be a blow for Turkey’s ambitions to join the European Union.

Erdogan had demanded membership of the EU as the price for stemming the tide of refugees pouring over his country’s borders into Europe. In exchange for the visa deal and £2.2billion in aid, he agreed to step up border controls, tackle people-smuggling gangs and re-admit failed asylum seekers who had entered Europe from Turkey.

Turkish politicians had argued that Turkey is ‘a major European power’ and with the exit of Britain, the EU will need to include the country as a member. 

However, the unrest in the past 24 hours is unlikely to help its case as concerns over the stability of the country and its human rights record surface once again.

As military took to the streets, Erdogan had urged his supporters to ignore a curfew and take back control of the country.

Tanks and armoured personnel carriers tried to seize strategic points in Istanbul and Ankara but were faced down by unarmed civilians who lay down in front of the heavy armour.

Police special forces headquarters was also hit and was razed to the ground. Other witnesses reported attack helicopters firing machine guns in the capital Ankara in a bid to depose the Islamic government.

There were also reports that a Turkish Air Force F-16 had shot down a Sikorsky helicopter over Ankara. The government claimed the jet destroyed the helicopter which had been ‘hijacked by coup plotters’.

In Takism square, around 30 rebel soldiers surrendered following a gun battle with police loyal to Erdogan. A number of F-16 fighter jets had screamed across the square at low level blasting the area with a sonic boom.

During the night, both the civilian government and the military claimed they were in control of the country, with reports of sporadic gunfire and explosions.

In a statement, the army faction said that they took action ‘to reinstall the constitutional order, democracy, human rights and freedoms, to ensure that the rule of law once again reigns in the country, for the law and order to be reinstated’.

The Turkish military has also long seen its role as safeguarding Turkey’s secularist agenda, and has staged numerous coup’s over the last 60 years when it feels the government’s stance is moving too far away from that.

The military said that ‘all international agreements and commitments will remain. We pledge that good relations with all world countries will continue’.

President Recep Erdogan, pictured centre, made a triumphant return to Istanbul following a botched military coup in Turkey

President Erdogan (pictured after the unsuccessful coup) has vowed revenge on those who tried to oust him in a bloody military coup that killed 42 people as his supporters clashed with the rebel forces in the streets of Turkey

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan is seen amid his supporters at the Ataturk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey on July 16 after his loyal forces successfully crushed the uprising

Huge crowds of supporters of Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan cheered as he left the Ataturk Airport in Istanbul, while hundreds of rebels were arrested

Thousands gathered, many carrying Turkish flags, in Ordu, Turkey after a rebel faction of the military unsuccessfully staged a coup

Protesters blocked the tanks from seizing the airport, which allowed President Erdogan to make his triumphant return to Istanbul 

Protesters blocked the tanks from seizing the airport, which allowed President Erdogan to make his triumphant return to Istanbul

Turkish army's tank entered the Ataturk Airport during the coup where witnesses say they heard explosive noises

People climbs on top of the military's tanks after a group of soldiers involved in the coup attempt were neutralized by police

Turkish citizens walk across the now-opened bridge after the horrors of last night, since the coup was successfully crushed

But the nation’s national intelligence released its own statement saying the coup had been ‘repelled’, although troops and heavy armour had continued to hold strategic locations in Ankara.

Meanwhile, Erdogan made it clear he believes rival Gulen is behind the attack.

Gulen’s nonprofit organization, the Alliance for Shared Values, denies any involvement and condemned the actions of the Turkish military.

Gulen, 75, was initially a close ally of Erdogan, who rose from the mayor of Istanbul to prime minister before he became president in 2014.

But the two fell out over a massive corruption scandal in 2013 that cost the country $100billion in a campaign thought to be initiated by Gulen’s followers against Erdogan’s closest allies.

Trained as an imam, Fethullah Gulen gained notice in Turkey some 50 years ago, promoting a philosophy that blended a mystical form of Islam with staunch advocacy of democracy, education, science and interfaith dialogue.

Erdogan has long accused Gulen of plotting to overthrow the officially secular government from a gated 26-acre compound in Pennsylvania’s Pocono Mountains, which has a population of about 1,100.

The President, who was on vacation in the resort town of Marmaris when the coup began, issued a statement to CNN tonight referring to a ‘parallel structure’ behind the coup, a reference to Gulen’s followers.

Amid the chaotic scenes, soldiers also seized control of the headquarters of the Dogan Media Group. A journalist broadcasting live on the station said she did not know how much longer she will be able to continue on the air.

Flight radar tracks President Erdogan’s journey to Istanbul

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3692693/Turkish-military-launch-attempted-coup-depose-government.html#ixzz4EZP2szj4
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6 thoughts on “Turkey: Military Coup against Erdogan Fails”

  1. A total of 194 people were killed in the Turkey coup attempt, the country’s acting military chief says.

    Umit Dundar says 47 civilians and 104 military personnel involved in the coup are among the dead.

    The other victims were 41 police officers and two soldiers not involved in the plot.

    The Turkish military announced late Friday that it was seizing power to restore order.

    Aerial bombings, military blockades and clashes between mobs and armed forces were reported across Turkey overnight, but the government has since largely quelled the uprising and arrested more than 1500 military personnel.

    “Those who betray their state and country will not go unpunished,” Dundar said.

    First Army commander General Dundar was appointed acting head of the military after Chief of the General Staff Hulusi Akar went missing.

    Akar has since been “rescued from captivity”, a government official said.

    Forces loyal to the government fought on Saturday to crush the remnants of the coup which crumbled after crowds answered President Tayyip Erdogan’s call to take to the streets and dozens of rebels abandoned their tanks.

    The faction of the armed forces which tried to seize power used tanks and attack helicopters. Some strafed the headquarters of Turkish intelligence and parliament in the capital, Ankara, and others seized a major bridge in Istanbul.

    Erdogan appeared to accuse the plotters of trying to kill him and said he would purge the armed forces, which in the past have staged a number of successful coups, although not for more than 30 years.

    “They will pay a heavy price for this,” he said.

    “This uprising is a gift from God to us because this will be a reason to cleanse our army.”

    Later, the presidency warned on Twitter that another uprising could be staged at any time.

    Turkish authorities had detained about 1500 members of the armed forces with many more likely, officials said.

    A successful overthrow of Erdogan, who has ruled Turkey since 2003, would have marked one of the biggest shifts in the Middle East in years, transforming a major US ally while war rages on its border.

    However, a failed coup attempt could still destabilise a NATO member that lies between the European Union and the chaos of Syria, with Islamic State bombers targeting Turkish cities and the government also at war with Kurdish separatists.

    Erdogan, who had been holidaying on the southwest coast when the coup was launched, flew into Istanbul before dawn on Saturday and was shown on TV outside Ataturk Airport.

    Addressing a crowd of thousands of flag-waving supporters at the airport later, he said the government remained at the helm, although disturbances continued in Ankara.

  2. Turkey into the EU is a very very bad mistake.

    A postmodern Trojan horse.

    One would hope the modernist would of succeeded. This failure, should be irrefutable proof that Turkey is not modern enough in it’s thinking to be a part of a modern Europe.

  3. COUP?? What coup??
    This is classic Bismarck tactic, pick a fight and use it to drive public opinion while at the same time crushing your enemies.
    Erdogan is in trouble, he has been for some time, and his pattern of working is: if I am in trouble, I pick a fight. Remember last year when he lost an election??
    So, his corruption secrets are beginning to ooze out slowly,
    His Syria strategy is unravelling as Russia destroys the Caliphate which, I am convinced, was Erdogans idea to raise again the Ottoman corpse.
    His plan of surrounding Israel too is in shambles as the Saudis warm up to Israel and Hamas and Hezbollah weaken.
    At home, the economy is faltering and an increasing number of people are complaining about refugees and terror attacks, and Erdogans own repression, and his islamist ideas……..
    Also, he has also in Vladimir Putin, an implacable for.
    So Erdogan planned a coup, orchestrated it, and then he plays the victim hero.
    Who starts a coup without arresting the leader first??
    And what leader is there who on hearing there is a coup going on, flies into his friends stronghold while texting and telling all where he is??
    This was no coup.

  4. BUT, Erdogans problem is, by this coup, he has run out of options.
    And also, he will, by victimising his enemies in the Army, create some very angry and powerful foes.
    Actually both he and his enemies have run out of ideas.
    Between Erdogan, and his enemies, and Turkey itself, someone will have to die.
    I give Erdogan 4years max.
    and then we can all sit and watch Turkey burn.
    (Right after Saudi Arabia burns too, Global Warming and stuff, like Libya…….)

      1. 1year for assassination….. mmmmh
        Mr. Hunt mohammed, we could bet, I say two years, you say one year. I say assassination, you say coup. Either way Erdogan Endgun……….
        A bet. Am ready to swear on a burnt out Koran……

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