Should our fighting men wear pussy hats?

An army should not be coy about its purpose

PC madness: “symbols, emblems and iconography at odds with Army’s values & the ethical force”

An army that bans Spartan symbols while promoting rainbow lapel pins has no credibility as a fighting force, and disrespects soldiers past and present.

Army bans troops from wearing ‘death’ symbols

 The pussyfication of our fighting forces.

Lieutenant General Campbell said the practice was arrogant, ill-considered and that it eroded the ethos of the Army…”

The idea is to kill your enemies! If you can frighten them first, great! I’m sure fairy wings will be appropriate instead!

Australia’s Chief of Army, Lieutenant General Angus Campbell, has issued a directive that prohibits the wearing of ‘death’ symbols.

Lieutenant General Campbell said the practice was arrogant, ill-considered and that it eroded the ethos of the Army.

The directive was circulated as an internal minute on April 17, and later posted to unofficial social media pages for commentary.

Several symbols were specifically prohibited because of their violent, murderous and vigilante symbolism including the Grim Reaper, the Skull and Crossbones, Spartans, and the Phantom or Punisher.

Campbell should be sacked. At once.

An open letter to Lt. General Campbell CA

In related news:

Islamophobia outbreak in Australia: Massive anti-terror security in place ahead of Anzac Day march

Concrete bollards, bag checks and vehicle blockers — why is all this necessary? Because of the possibility that some Muslims might try to carry out a jihad massacre. But don’t Sydney authorities know that it’s a Religion of Peace and only greasy Islamophobes think otherwise? How dare they suggest that there is a problem with jihad terrorism — even as, of course, they refuse to name it or identify the source of the threat in any way? They need “Islamophobia” reeducation, pronto.

“Concrete bollards, bag checks and vehicle blockers: Police beef up anti-terrorism security ahead of Anzac Day dawn march in Sydney,” Daily Mail Australia, April 22, 2018: JW

An army should not be coy about its purpose

Miranda Devine Daily Telegraph April 22, 2018

My grandfather Jack Magee fought on the Western Front in World War One with the Australian 51st Batallion. A red-haired, broad-shouldered crack shot from the WA wheatbelt, he survived the savage battles of 1917-1918 which raged around French villages such as Pozieres, Mouquet Farm and Ypres.

At Noureuil, on April 2, 1917, he was wounded and awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM) for “conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty”. He was just 18 years old.

He was patched up in England and sent back to the front.

On Anzac Day 100 years ago, he was involved in the legendary attack on Villers-Brettonneux, which decimated the 51st.

By the time he returned to Australia at the end of the war, after a stint of officer training at Oxford University, he was not yet 22 and had spent 44 months in the AIF, including thirteen tours on the front line.

Of 97 men enlisted from the Kulin district of WA, 24 had been killed. He mourned his fallen mates for the rest of his life.

I only knew him as a taciturn old man, and he never mentioned the war, but my mother said he rarely mentioned it when she was growing up, either.

He went back to a quiet life on the family farm, apart from enlisting again in WWII, and the only reminders of war were the horse he called Fritz, a fondness for French baguettes and a reluctance to eat meat after he killed a sheep.

“Poor brute” he would say, as he slit its throat.

So, my gentle grandfather had killed with courage and valour but he was not a killer.

He probably would not have wanted to wear the kind of “death iconography” that Lt General Angus Campbell banned last week in a letter to all of Army.

I say this to try to understand where Campbell, AO, DSC, no armchair general like his predecessor but a seasoned former SAS squadron commander, might be coming from.

Campbell’s first act after being announced as new Chief of Defence last week was to ban Australian soldiers from displaying “symbols of death” or iconography glorifying war.

“On visits across army and our deployed forces I have occasionally come across the display … of symbols, emblems and iconography at odds with Army’s values and the ethical force we seek to build and sustain,” he wrote in a two page directive last week.

“I refer in particular to the use of what could be termed ‘death’ symbology/iconography such as the pirate skull and crossbones (maritime outlaws and murderers), the Phantom or Punisher symbols (vigilantes), Spartans (extreme militarism) or Grim Reaper (bringer of death).”

Campbell says such symbology “implicitly encourages the inculcation of an arrogant hubris and general disregard for the most serious responsibility of our profession: the legitimate and discriminate taking of life… As soldiers our purpose is to preserve the state, employing violence with humility always and compassion wherever possible.”

So a soldier is to kill and die for the Turncoat gubmint,  not for the people of Australia, not for the country, but for the ruling class? I have a problem with  that.

Employing violence with humility and compassion is a noble aim. Glorifying death does not honour our veterans, past and present, who often suffer from the deeds we require of them in war.

And yet, Campbell’s edict has gone down like a lead balloon, especially with those Australian veterans who served in Task Force Spartan in Afghanistan in 2006, a joint endeavour with the United States’ 10th Mountain Division. Are their JT Spartan caps now verboten?

And what about the RAAF’s C-27J Spartan Squadron operating the C-27J Spartan battlefield airlifter out of Richmond air base? What do they do about the “Spartan” on their Squadron patch?

The US Infantry has a Spartan combat brigade. Canadian military drills are named “Spartan Warrior”. The British use “Spartan” armoured vehicles.

Pirate skulls is one thing, but banning the Spartan mythology embedded in modern militaries is control freakery beyond the power of any general.

Memes mocking Campbell’s ban sprang up immediately in military circles last week, including a cartoon of Fred Jones, the leader of Scooby Doo gang, unmasking Campbell with the caption “Let’s see who the new CDF really is”. Lo and behold, underneath is David Morrison.

It would be easier to take Campbell at his word if he weren’t such a disciple of the diversity religion promoted by former Sex Discrimination Commissioner Liz Broderick, along with fellow “Male Champions of Change” Morrison and Qantas CEO Alan Joyce.

Morrison and Broderick’s social experiment to stamp out the male “Anglo Saxon” warrior culture in the Army destroyed good men, damaged morale and threatens our war fighting capability.

Unfortunately, as Chief of Army since 2015, Campbell appears to have drunk the Kool Aid, bollocking Army recruiters for not hitting diversity targets fast enough and authorising a rainbow-coloured Army Pride lapel pin provided to troops at taxpayer expense as part of the official uniform in honour of Sydney’s Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras.

An army that bans Spartan symbols while promoting rainbow lapel pins has no credibility as a fighting force, and disrespects soldiers past and present.

1/ Lt Gen Angus Campbell named new Australian Defence Force chief

2/ My grandfather Jack Magee (centre) returning to Australia from WWI. It’s unlikely he’d have wanted to wear any kind of “death symbol” but Angus Campbell’s directive has gone down like a lead balloon with many in the army.

3/ A member of the Iraqi Special Forces wears a skull mask in Mosul in 2016. (Pic: Thomas Coex/AFP)

4/ A meme circulating in military circles showing Angus Campbell’s face being removed to reveal David Morrison as the real Chief of Defence.

Image may contain: 1 person
Image may contain: 3 people, people smiling
Image may contain: one or more people and outdoor
Image may contain: 2 people, meme and text
LikeShow More Reactions

Comment

2 thoughts on “Should our fighting men wear pussy hats?”

  1. EVERYONE I knew when I was enlisted would have loved to have been allowed to sport a nasty skull symbol or two!

    But then again, that was in the late 1970s/early 1980s!

    You know, before the PC victimology pussification began.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *