YET ANOTHER MOHAMMEDAN RAPE GANG JAILED

Two of them could be sikhs. But they could also be converts to Islam.

Huddersfield rape gang

Huddersfield rape gang

Andrew Bolt Blog Posts

Yet another mainly-Muslim rape gang is jailed in Britain, the latest of an incredibly long list:

Twenty men have been found guilty of being part of a grooming gang that raped and abused girls as young as 11 in Huddersfield.

The men were convicted of more than 120 offences against 15 girls.

Victims were plied with drink and drugs and then “used and abused at will” in a seven-year “campaign of rape and abuse” between 2004 and 2011…

During the three trials, jurors heard how the men – who are all British Asians mainly of Pakistani heritage – preyed on young, vulnerable girls, one of whom was described as having the mental age of a seven-year-old.

The names suggest two Sikhs and the rest Muslims:

Amere Singh Dhaliwal, 35, of Holly Road, Huddersfield, guilty of 54 counts, including 22 counts of rape, sentenced to life with a minimum term of 18 years

Irfan Ahmed, 34, of Yews Hill Road, Huddersfield, guilty of one count of sexual assault and two counts of trafficking for sexual exploitation, sentenced to eight years

Zahid Hassan, 29, of Bland Street Huddersfield, guilty of six counts of rape, one count of attempted rape, one count of sexual assault, one count of trafficking for sexual exploitation, two counts of child abduction, two counts of supplying class A drugs sentenced to 18 years

Mohammed Kammer, 34, of West View, Huddersfield, guilty of two counts of rape, sentenced to 16 years

Mohammed Rizwan Aslam, 31, of Huddersfield Road, Dewsbury, guilty of two counts of rape, sentenced to 15 years

Abdul Rehman, 31, of Darnely Drive, Sheffield, guilty of supplying a class C drug, one count of rape, one count of assault and one count of trafficking for sexual exploitation, sentenced to 16 years

Raj Singh Barsran, 34, of Caldercliffe Road, Huddersfield, guilty of rape and two counts of sexual assault, sentenced to 17 years

Nahman Mohammed, 32, of West View, Huddersfield, guilty of two counts of rape and one count of trafficking for sexual exploitation, sentenced to 15 years

Mansoor Akhtar, 27, of Blackmoorfoot Road, Huddersfield, guilty of two counts of rape and two counts of trafficking for sexual exploitation, sentenced to eight years

Wiqas Mahmud, 38, of Banks Crescent, Huddersfield, guilty of three counts of rape, sentenced to 15 years

Nasarat Hussain, 30, of Upper Mount Street, Huddersfield, guilty of three counts of rape and one count of sexual assault, sentenced to 17 years

Sajid Hussain, of 33, of Grasmere Road, Huddersfield, guilty of two counts of rape, sentenced to 17 years

Mohammed Irfraz, 30, of North Road, Huddersfield, guilty of child abduction and two counts of trafficking for sexual exploitation, sentenced to six years

Faisal Nadeem, 32, of Carr Green, Huddersfield, guilty of rape and supplying class A drugs, sentenced to 12 years

Mohammed Azeem, 33, of Wrose Road, Bradford, guilty of five counts of rape, sentenced to 18 years

Manzoor Hassan, 38, of Bland Street, Huddersfield, guilty of administering a noxious substance, inciting child prostitution and supplying a class A drug, sentenced to five years

Mohammed Akram, 33, of Springdale Street, Huddersfield, guilty of two counts of rape and two counts of trafficking for sexual exploitation and awaiting sentencing

Niaz Ahmed, 54, of Woodthorpe Terrace, Huddersfield, guilty of sexual assault and inciting a child to engage in sexual activity and awaiting sentencing

Asif Bashir, 33, of Thornton Lodge Road, Huddersfield, guilty of, rape and attempted rape and awaiting sentencing

Mohammed Imran Ibrar, 34, of Manchester Road, Huddersfield, guilty of trafficking for sexual exploitation and assault and awaiting sentencing

Add this to a staggering list of mainly-Muslim sex gangs preying on literally thousands of girls – with authorities sometimes too scared to act for fear of seeming racist:

The stories of the victims in the Huddersfield prosecution are almost identical to those told in Rochdale, Rotherham, Newcastle, Oxford, Aylesbury, Telford and a host of other places across the country.

These involved girls, sometimes as young as 11 or 12, being groomed and abused by groups of men, often of Pakistani-heritage backgrounds…

A series of court cases received a small amount of media attention including the jailing of five men in Rotherham in 2010 and another in Derby in the same year…

But the full scope of the problem was exposed in January 2011 when The Times published a detailed investigation into a “conspiracy of silence on UK sex gangs”.

The Times investigation pulled together more than a dozen prosecutions involving the on-street grooming of teenage girls by groups of men involving 13 different towns and cities..

In 2012 nine men were jailed for a string of sexual offences against girls in Rochdale in a case which received much more attention. Police said as many as 50 girls could have been victims of the gang…

Later in 2012, The Times published the results of an 18-month investigation into child sexual exploitation in Rotherham.

This led to the 2014 report by Professor Alexis Jay which provoked a national wave of shock when it revealed more than 1,400 children had been exploited in the town over more than a decade as police and council services ignored what was going on…

The National Crime Agency… said there were 1,510 potential victims and survivors of CSE in the town. It … had identified 110 “designated suspects” …

In 2013, the Old Bailey heard almost identical stories as five men were given life sentences in relation to an exploitation ring in Oxford and in 2015 it was Aylesbury’s turn to have exploitation secrets exposed.

Such prosecutions became so commonplace, they began to get less and less media attention until August 2017, when 17 men and one woman were convicted in a series of trials at Newcastle Crown Court…

Earlier this year, Telford became the latest town to become the focus of the familiar stories of abuse.

A Sunday Mirror investigation concluded that around 1,000 children could have been sexually exploited in the Shropshire town over a 40-year period, leading to calls for a public inquiry.

Can anyone seriously argue that this has nothing to do with an us-against-them culture, or a culture that makes women second-class, especially if they are not Muslim?

And again and again we see the same fear of holding Muslims to the standards of the host country – a self-loathing fear that has created the “it’s OK to be white” backlash:

In many of these towns, police and social workers were aware of what was happening to some of the victims but action was not taken due to a range of factors including difficulties in getting the girls to cooperate, a warped belief that they were consenting to what happened to them and misplaced fears over being branded racist.

But let us not overlook the sickness in another culture – in this case Britain’s own. The home lives of some of the victims of the Huddersfield rape gang suggest a collapse in the moral order that left several of the girls desperately vulnerable:

Many of them were socially isolated and as such became “easy targets for abuse”, the court heard.

Among the victims were girls with mild learning disabilities, girls who were bullied at school; one girl’s mother was completely unable to look after her because of her own drink and drug problems…

Victims and their families say they repeatedly told police and the authorities what was happening at the time but that it had fallen on deaf ears. One woman said she had even written to the Prime Minister.

One girl said when she tried to tell two officers who took her to hospital after she was assaulted by one of her abusers they told her “you must have wanted it”.

One day, surely, we will be able to have a sane discussion on immigration – and the danger of importing certain cultures. The danger to our most vulnerable.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.