Sunni vs Shiite views on the Melbourne terror attack

Mohammad Tawhidi, an Iranian shiite who calls himself the “Imam of Peace,” takes on Australia’s sunni majority for not admitting that Islamic terror is not what it is. Tawhidi’s following is entirely Twitter based, no mosque will have him and he’d better stay out of sunni neighbourhoods, which would be hazardous to his health.

War of the imams: Muslim scholar jumps to Scott Morrison’s defence after sheikh slammed PM for saying Bourke Street jihadi was a ‘radical, extremist terrorist’
  • An imam supported PM Scott Morrison’s comments about Bourke St attacker 
  • Hassan Khalif Shire Ali tried to blow up his ute and stabbed three men on Friday
  • Mr Morrison was criticised for saying Shire Ali was a ‘radical, extremist terrorist’ 
  • The PM also said it’s a ‘lame excuse’ to suggest mental health could be blamed
  • Islamic scholar Mohammad Tawhidi has since defended Mr Morrison’s stance 
Renowned restaurateur Sisto Malaspina (pictured) was killed in Friday's Bourke St attack 

Renowned restaurateur Sisto Malaspina (pictured) was killed in Friday’s Bourke St attack

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Calls to deport extremists quicker after Somali-born Islamic terrorist stabbed three, killing one, in the heart of Melbourne

A prominent Islamic scholar has defended Scott Morrison after the Prime Minister was criticised for saying the Bourke Street attacker was a ‘radical, extremist terrorist’.

Mohammad Tawhidi, also known as the Imam of Peace, came to the defence of the Prime Minister while speaking to 2GB’s Ben Fordham on Monday.

Mr Morrison was slammed last week for saying Hassan Khalif Shire Ali was a ‘radical, extremist terrorist’ and suggesting mental health was to blame was a ‘lame excuse’.

One of the first people to challenge the PM’s comments was the leader of an Islamic youth centre where Shire Ali frequently attended prayer sessions.

Islamic scholar Mohammad Tawhidi (pictured), also known as the Imam of Peace, came to the the defence of the PM when he spoke to 2GB's Ben Fordham on Monday

Islamic scholar Mohammad Tawhidi (pictured), also known as the Imam of Peace, came to the the defence of the PM when he spoke to 2GB’s Ben Fordham on Monday

Hume Islamic Youth Centre emir Sheikh Mohammed Omran said the PM should be held accountable for police inaction before he blamed Islamic leaders

Hume Islamic Youth Centre emir Sheikh Mohammed Omran said the PM should be held accountable for police inaction before he blamed Islamic leaders

Hume Islamic Youth Centre emir Sheikh Mohammed Omran told The Australian the PM should be held accountable for police inaction before he blamed Islamic leaders.

But Mr Tawhidi said Mr Morrison was ‘1000 per cent’ correct and had nothing to apologise for.

‘The Prime Minister did the right thing,’ Mr Tawhidi told Mr Fordham. ‘He defined the problem – it is radical, Islamist, extremist, violent Islam.

‘He has nothing to apologise for. He was very brave for doing that and he was 1000 per cent right.’

On Friday, 30-year-old Shire Ali was shot dead by police on Bourke Street after he tried to blow up his ute, stabbed three men, and then lunged at officers with a knife.

Following the terrorising ordeal, the PM – a devout Christian – said he was all for religious freedoms but added, he had to be the first person to call out extremism.

He also said no religion was immune to extremism, which takes many forms around the world, The Australian reported.

‘We would be kidding ourselves if we did not call out the fact that the greatest threat of religious extremism in this country is the radical and dangerous ideology of extremist Islam,’ Mr Morrison said.

Scott Morrison (pictured) was slammed last week for saying Hassan Khalif Shire Ali was a 'radical, extremist terrorist' and suggesting mental health was to blame was a 'lame excuse'

Scott Morrison (pictured) was slammed last week for saying Hassan Khalif Shire Ali was a ‘radical, extremist terrorist’ and suggesting mental health was to blame was a ‘lame excuse’

Following the PM’s comments, Labor MP Anne Aly – the first Muslim woman elected to the Federal Parliament – hit back at Mr Morrision.

‘The Prime Minister needs to do a little terrorism 101 before he starts talking in short phrases and catch phrases and know what he is talking about before he starts dividing communities and pointing fingers at radical Islam.’

On Friday, 30-year-old Shire Ali (centre) was shot dead by police on Bourke Street after he tried to blow up his ute, stabbed three men, and then lunged at officers with a knife

On Friday, 30-year-old Shire Ali (centre) was shot dead by police on Bourke Street after he tried to blow up his ute, stabbed three men, and then lunged at officers with a knife

Speaking to Sky News, Ms Aly said violent Jihadism is a genuine problem but domestic violence was a far more common problem.

Mr Fordham brought up the issue of Ms Aly’s comments when speaking to Mr Tawhidi and said: ‘Surely we can address both of these issues.’

Mr Tawhidi agreed, saying: ‘Yes, you definitely can. Both are wrong and both are bad for society, but she (Ms Aly) can’t basically justify this because of that.

‘When it comes to domestic violence, it’s one individual or a group of individuals having a go at other individuals.

‘But when it comes to terrorism, you have one terrorist that can take out tens of people – you can’t compare. In fact, one terrorist is too much.’

Mr Tawhidi said Ms Aly’s attempts to ‘try and downplay’ the Bourke Street attack were irresponsible.

‘What she (Ms Aly) said was not in the interest of Australia, of our Federal police, and certainly will not be well received by victims of terrorism.’

Mr Tawhidi said such acts of terrorism need to be seen for what they are and not explained away with claims of psychological issues.

‘If we all agree it’s mental illness, then people will just say it’s mental illness, but when do say it’s violent, extremist Islam then we start working in that path to try and fix the problem within society,’ he said.

Mr Tawhidi (pictured) said when it comes to these kind of issues, people need to define exactly what is going on so that it can lead the way to resolving the problem

Mr Tawhidi (pictured) said when it comes to these kind of issues, people need to define exactly what is going on so that it can lead the way to resolving the problem

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